2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157599
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mammography Decision-Making Processes of Rarely or Never-Screened Women
Abstract:
Mammography Decision-Making Processes of Rarely or Never-Screened Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Purtzer, Mary Anne, Ph.D., R.N.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wyoming, Fay W. Whitney School of Nursing, College of Health Sciences
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY, 82071-2000, USA
Contact Telephone:307-766-6576
Introduction: The purpose of this study was to discover theory of decision-making processes rather than factors contributing to lack of mammography screening. Breast cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity. There is a strong association between survival and early detection through regular mammography. Low-income women underutilize this life-saving screening resulting in a disproportionate cancer burden. To understand mammography-screening, decision-making processes of disparate groups, a qualitative study was conducted. Method: Grounded theory was utilized as it is consistent with the focus on process. Sampling included five low-income, uninsured participants. Three participants were asymptomatic for breast cancer and had not had a mammogram in the past five-or-more years. One participant reported symptoms and family history of breast cancer with no mammogram within five years. One participant was treated for breast cancer and had no history of prior mammography. In-depth interviews were conducted with three to four recurring cycles of data collection and analysis per participant. Results: Findings offer a new theoretical explanation specific to mammography-screening decision-making processes. New conceptual categories emerged: (a) intuitive dominance and intuitive confidence; (b) scarce, supportive relational resources for learning; and (c) dichotomous healthcare beliefs. The concept, coping with uncertainty, provides an interruption in intuitive thought patterns offering a window of opportunity for reasoned thought and an informed mammography-screening decision. Findings also offer new considerations for NANDA diagnoses, including related factors, assessment, interventions, and outcomes. Nursing Implications: Implications are offered with the intent of engaging in a client-centered practice resulting in informed decision-making, relational-based knowledge acquisition, empowerment, and potential transformation in thinking processes. Implications include: (a) emphasis on nurse/client rapport and trust; (b) client assessment in non-traditional areas, including thinking style, view of authority, health beliefs, and social support; (c) integration of a parallel nurse self-assessment; and (d) facilitation of relationship-based knowledge construction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMammography Decision-Making Processes of Rarely or Never-Screened Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157599-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mammography Decision-Making Processes of Rarely or Never-Screened Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Purtzer, Mary Anne, Ph.D., R.N.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wyoming, Fay W. Whitney School of Nursing, College of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY, 82071-2000, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">307-766-6576</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mpurtzer@uwyo.edu, mapnelson@msn.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: The purpose of this study was to discover theory of decision-making processes rather than factors contributing to lack of mammography screening. Breast cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity. There is a strong association between survival and early detection through regular mammography. Low-income women underutilize this life-saving screening resulting in a disproportionate cancer burden. To understand mammography-screening, decision-making processes of disparate groups, a qualitative study was conducted. Method: Grounded theory was utilized as it is consistent with the focus on process. Sampling included five low-income, uninsured participants. Three participants were asymptomatic for breast cancer and had not had a mammogram in the past five-or-more years. One participant reported symptoms and family history of breast cancer with no mammogram within five years. One participant was treated for breast cancer and had no history of prior mammography. In-depth interviews were conducted with three to four recurring cycles of data collection and analysis per participant. Results: Findings offer a new theoretical explanation specific to mammography-screening decision-making processes. New conceptual categories emerged: (a) intuitive dominance and intuitive confidence; (b) scarce, supportive relational resources for learning; and (c) dichotomous healthcare beliefs. The concept, coping with uncertainty, provides an interruption in intuitive thought patterns offering a window of opportunity for reasoned thought and an informed mammography-screening decision. Findings also offer new considerations for NANDA diagnoses, including related factors, assessment, interventions, and outcomes. Nursing Implications: Implications are offered with the intent of engaging in a client-centered practice resulting in informed decision-making, relational-based knowledge acquisition, empowerment, and potential transformation in thinking processes. Implications include: (a) emphasis on nurse/client rapport and trust; (b) client assessment in non-traditional areas, including thinking style, view of authority, health beliefs, and social support; (c) integration of a parallel nurse self-assessment; and (d) facilitation of relationship-based knowledge construction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:01:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:01:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.