2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157600
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Men Navigating Inward and Outward Through Depression
Abstract:
Men Navigating Inward and Outward Through Depression
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ramirez, Jeff, PhD, MSN, MPA, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Gonzaga University, Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:4028 E. 20th, Spokane, WA, 99223, USA
Contact Telephone:509-299-4498
Purpose:  The purpose of this study was to uncover the basic social and psychological processes of men who are living with depression.  The outcome of the study resulted in the development of a substantive theory. Background:  Previous studies that have investigated men and depression identified that men have an increase vulnerability to depression because men tend to be unidentified, under diagnosed, and untreated for depression.  Men who are suffering from depression may be under diagnosed because they present to their health care provider with symptoms that may mask depression such as fatigue, irritability, substance abuse, aggression, or other somatic complaints. Method: This was a qualitative study using grounded theory methods.  After receiving full IRB approval and voluntary consent from 9 participants, an interview was conducted with each man, with two men participating in a second interview for member checks. The interviews were audio tabbed and transcribed into a word document and analyzed by the researcher.  Data quality was maintained. Results:  The process of navigating was the core concept and defined as a process of moving through depression and having to steer one?s life in different directions in order to move in and out of the stages of depression. The first stage was: Being Different. In this stage the men attempted to share their feelings,  but were constantly rejected by society came to believe that nobody cared or nobody would understand their feelings.  The second stage, Concealing Feelings, refers to how the men learned to navigate out of stage one and into stage two of learning to hide their internal feelings and thoughts.  The third stage, Disconnecting, was defined as the way the men would numb their emotional pain.  As their emotional pain became more intense, the concealing no longer worked.  The men used external behaviors to physically numb their pain. The fourth stage, Hitting Bottom, refers to the men losing hope for their future and wanting to give up on life. The men had thoughts of suicide or thoughts that death would be an option to relieve the emotional pain. The fifth stage, Acknowledging and Confronting, refers to the ability to acknowledge they were depressed and understand how depression was affecting their lives.  The sixth stage, Healing With Others, refers to the point the men were able to share their thoughts and feelings with other and began to heal with others by sharing their experiences. Implications: These findings provide implications for both assessing and treatment men with depression. This study will provide nurses and other healthcare providers  the clinical knowledge necessary for early detection of depression among men who are vulnerable to the associated health risks and predict the health consequences of depression.  Future research will need to test interventions to assist men to navigate through depression more rapidly receiving the treatment needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMen Navigating Inward and Outward Through Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157600-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Men Navigating Inward and Outward Through Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ramirez, Jeff, PhD, MSN, MPA, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Gonzaga University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4028 E. 20th, Spokane, WA, 99223, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">509-299-4498</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ramireje@dshs.wa.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this study was to uncover the basic social and psychological processes of men who are living with depression.&nbsp; The outcome of the study resulted in the development of a substantive theory.&nbsp;Background:&nbsp; Previous studies that have investigated men and depression identified that men have an increase vulnerability to depression because men tend to be unidentified, under diagnosed, and untreated for depression.&nbsp; Men who are suffering from depression may be under diagnosed because they present to their health care provider with symptoms that may mask depression such as fatigue, irritability, substance abuse, aggression, or other somatic complaints.&nbsp;Method: This was a qualitative study using grounded theory methods.&nbsp; After receiving full IRB approval and voluntary consent from 9 participants, an interview was conducted with each man, with two men participating in a second interview for member checks. The interviews were audio tabbed and transcribed into a word document and analyzed by the researcher.&nbsp; Data quality was maintained.&nbsp;Results:&nbsp; The process of navigating was the core concept and defined as a process of moving through depression and having to steer one?s life in different directions in order to move in and out of the stages of depression. The first stage was:&nbsp;Being Different.&nbsp;In this stage the men attempted to share their feelings,&nbsp; but were constantly rejected by society came to believe that nobody cared or nobody would understand their feelings.&nbsp; The second stage, Concealing Feelings, refers to how the men learned to navigate out of stage one and into stage two of learning to hide their internal feelings and thoughts.&nbsp; The third stage, Disconnecting, was defined as the way the men would numb their emotional pain.&nbsp; As their emotional pain became more intense, the concealing no longer worked.&nbsp; The men used external behaviors to physically numb their pain. The fourth stage, Hitting Bottom, refers to the men losing hope for their future and wanting to give up on life. The men had thoughts of suicide or thoughts that death would be an option to relieve the emotional pain. The fifth stage, Acknowledging and Confronting, refers to the ability to acknowledge they were depressed and understand how depression was affecting their lives.&nbsp; The sixth stage, Healing With Others, refers to the point the men were able to share their thoughts and feelings with other and began to heal with others by sharing their experiences.&nbsp;Implications:&nbsp;These findings provide implications for both assessing and treatment men with depression. This study will provide nurses and other healthcare providers&nbsp; the clinical knowledge necessary for early detection of depression among men who are vulnerable to the associated health risks and predict the health consequences of depression.&nbsp; Future research will need to test interventions to assist men to navigate through depression more rapidly receiving the treatment needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:01:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:01:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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