2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157604
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educational Advocacy for Youth With Complex Needs: Conflict & Collaboration
Abstract:
Educational Advocacy for Youth With Complex Needs: Conflict & Collaboration
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Rehm, Roberta S., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California at San Francisco, Family Health Care Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:2426 35th Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94116, USA
Contact Telephone:415-502-6762
Co-Authors:Lucille T. Fisher, PhD, RN, Assistant Adjunct Professor
Purpose: Part of a larger study of parent planning for the transition to adulthood for youth age 14-25, this analysis focused on 32 youth, age 14-21 years, with concurrent physical and developmental chronic conditions. The aim of this analysis was to examine advocacy practices and planning of parents and educators during high school years. Background: Youth with complex physical and developmental needs require ongoing support as they leave high school and transition to adulthood. Federal law mandates planning for this transition, necessitating cooperation between families and professionals. Methods: This was an ethnographic, interpretive field study, based on a Symbolic Interaction framework. Data was collected in 2 home visits that included parent interviews, youth observations and interviews (when verbal), observations of Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, and interviews with home-room special education teachers. Analysis included coding using Atlas Ti for data management, construction of family summaries, field notes, memos, and discussion leading to consensus among research team members. Results: Youth with complex needs fell across a wide spectrum of abilities and ongoing health challenges, including some that could shorten lifespan, and others that resulted in frequent school absences. The transition to adulthood was a long process necessitating examination by parents and educators of the youth?s future potential, including ongoing health needs, suitability for an adult day program, further education, or employment beyond high school. This process often led to reprioritization of educational goals. Using thematic analysis, the following major categories were identified: 1) Parents and educators frequently had differing assessments of the youth?s abilities and potential for educational progress, resulting in conflicts; 2) Parents and professionals used multiple levels of advocacy including personal and professional relationships, IEP meetings, community advocates, and legal proceedings; and 3) Both parents and professionals voiced support for collaboration and cooperation rather than antagonism in their relationships. The unifying theme for these categories was: Reaching equilibrium and a cooperative working relationship in the face of competing priorities was an ongoing struggle for parents and educators. Outcomes varied for participant families. Some parents established ongoing cooperative relationships with teachers, while others were able to resolve conflict by successfully negotiating for mutually agreeable services for their youth. Other parents experienced recurrent conflict leading to antagonism with school administrators, including lawsuits or changes in school assignments. Parents and educators recognized that parent advocacy played an important role in the distribution of school services, resulting in disparities in accommodations and programs. Implications: Cooperation between parents and educators could be facilitated by ongoing physical and developmental assessment within educational and health systems that helps both family members and professionals to recognize developmental progress and set realistic goals. Much greater emphasis must be placed on equitable distribution of resources; and nurses could assist families to learn advocacy skills and negotiation of complex systems.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducational Advocacy for Youth With Complex Needs: Conflict & Collaborationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157604-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Educational Advocacy for Youth With Complex Needs: Conflict &amp; Collaboration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rehm, Roberta S., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California at San Francisco, Family Health Care Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2426 35th Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94116, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-502-6762</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">roberta.rehm@ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lucille T. Fisher, PhD, RN, Assistant Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Part of a larger study of parent planning for the transition to adulthood for youth age 14-25, this analysis focused on 32 youth, age 14-21 years, with concurrent physical and developmental chronic conditions. The aim of this analysis was to examine advocacy practices and planning of parents and educators during high school years.&nbsp;Background: Youth with complex physical and developmental needs require ongoing support as they leave high school and transition to adulthood. Federal law mandates planning for this transition, necessitating cooperation between families and professionals. Methods: This was an ethnographic, interpretive field study, based on a Symbolic Interaction framework. Data was collected in 2 home visits that included parent interviews, youth observations and interviews (when verbal), observations of Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings, and interviews with home-room special education teachers. Analysis included coding using Atlas Ti for data management, construction of family summaries, field notes, memos, and discussion leading to consensus among research team members. Results: Youth with complex needs fell across a wide spectrum of abilities and ongoing health challenges, including some that could shorten lifespan, and others that resulted in frequent school absences. The transition to adulthood was a long process necessitating examination by parents and educators of the youth?s future potential, including ongoing health needs, suitability for an adult day program, further education, or employment beyond high school. This process often led to reprioritization of educational goals. Using thematic analysis, the following major categories were identified: 1) Parents and educators frequently had differing assessments of the youth?s abilities and potential for educational progress, resulting in conflicts; 2) Parents and professionals used multiple levels of advocacy including personal and professional relationships, IEP meetings, community advocates, and legal proceedings; and 3) Both parents and professionals voiced support for collaboration and cooperation rather than antagonism in their relationships. The unifying theme for these categories was: Reaching equilibrium and a cooperative working relationship in the face of competing priorities was an ongoing struggle for parents and educators. Outcomes varied for participant families. Some parents established ongoing cooperative relationships with teachers, while others were able to resolve conflict by successfully negotiating for mutually agreeable services for their youth. Other parents experienced recurrent conflict leading to antagonism with school administrators, including lawsuits or changes in school assignments. Parents and educators recognized that parent advocacy played an important role in the distribution of school services, resulting in disparities in accommodations and programs. Implications: Cooperation between parents and educators could be facilitated by ongoing physical and developmental assessment within educational and health systems that helps both family members and professionals to recognize developmental progress and set realistic goals. Much greater emphasis must be placed on equitable distribution of resources; and nurses could assist families to learn advocacy skills and negotiation of complex systems.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:01:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:01:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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