2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157606
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Benefits of Meditative Movement and Implications for Practice
Abstract:
Health Benefits of Meditative Movement and Implications for Practice
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Rogers, Carol E., RN, MS, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, Nursing
Title:PhD Student
Contact Address:500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA
Contact Telephone:602-677-0711
Co-Authors:Roger Jahnke, OMD, Director; Linda K. Larkey, PhD, CRTT, Research Associate Professor
Purpose: This presentation is designed to a) propose a definition of Meditative Movement (MM), including proposed characteristics and standardization recommendations, b) provide results of a comprehensive review of Qigong (QG) and Tai Chi (TC) as representatives of MM, describing the range of health benefits and populations responding to these practices, and c) discuss implications for application of findings for research and nursing practice. Background:  Research examining psychological and physiological benefits of QG and TC is growing rapidly. The wide range of practices described as QG or TC has similar philosophical roots and expected benefit, but reviews generally treat them as separate targets of examination. Acknowledging QG and TC as forms of MM, noting the fit to the definition, and examining outcomes related to standard elements, allows for broadening the understanding of these similar practices. MM is defined as practices that include a focus on movement or postures, focus on the mind, and focus on the breath for achieving deep states of relaxation and spiritual connection. Methods: Key words tai chi, taiji, Qigong were searched in the Cumulative Index for Allied Health and Nursing, Psychological Literature, PubMed, and Cochrane database. Inclusion criteria: a) randomized controlled trials (RCTs); b) testing QG or TC; c) published in peer reviewed journals, 1993-2007; and d) published in English. Data collected for analysis: country, type and duration of exercise, number/type of subjects, control conditions, and reported outcomes. All outcomes related to QG and TC were identified and evaluated. Results: Seventy-eight RCTs met criteria. Nine outcome category groupings emerged: bone density (n=4), cardiopulmonary effects (n=19), physical function (n=16), falls and related risk factors (n=23), Quality of Life (n=17), self-efficacy (n=8), patient reported outcomes (n=13), psychological symptoms (n=27), and immune function (n=6). Many studies reported significant responses to these forms of MM compared to an inactive control. Failure to achieve significance generally was associated with active controls with intervention elements expected to achieve similar results, very small numbers of participants, severe chronic illness, or weak MM intervention (e.g., short duration). Studies did not consistently report sufficient dosing information to allow a meaningful meta-analysis. Very few studies cited prior research with relative forms of MM that may have supported or explained results. Conclusions: Many patient populations including various geographic regions, age groups, and disease categories have been shown to benefit from TC and QG in 9 different categories of outcomes. It is time to look beyond our current models of physical activity/exercise and embrace the MM constructs in Nursing care to help transition frail, fatigued, and chronic sufferers of pain into a more active lifestyle while reaping benefits previously thought to only accrue to those practicing more vigorous exercises. Practice Implications: Participants will participate in discussions to plan appropriate recommendations and referrals for MM, including TC and QG, for building health among selected, most-likely-to-benefit populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Benefits of Meditative Movement and Implications for Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157606-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Benefits of Meditative Movement and Implications for Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rogers, Carol E., RN, MS, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-677-0711</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.rogers@asu.edu, easter3@cox.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Roger Jahnke, OMD, Director; Linda K. Larkey, PhD, CRTT, Research Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation is designed to a) propose a definition of Meditative Movement (MM), including proposed characteristics and standardization recommendations, b) provide results of a comprehensive review of Qigong (QG) and Tai Chi (TC) as representatives of MM, describing the range of health benefits and populations responding to these practices, and c) discuss implications for application of findings for research and nursing practice. Background:&nbsp; Research examining psychological and physiological benefits of QG and TC is growing rapidly. The wide range of practices described as QG or TC has similar philosophical roots and expected benefit, but reviews generally treat them as separate targets of examination. Acknowledging QG and TC as forms of MM, noting the fit to the definition, and examining outcomes related to standard elements, allows for broadening the understanding of these similar practices. MM is defined as practices that include a focus on movement or postures, focus on the mind, and focus on the breath for achieving deep states of relaxation and spiritual connection. Methods: Key words tai chi, taiji, Qigong were searched in the Cumulative Index for Allied Health and Nursing, Psychological Literature, PubMed, and Cochrane database. Inclusion criteria: a) randomized controlled trials (RCTs); b) testing QG or TC; c) published in peer reviewed journals, 1993-2007; and d) published in English. Data collected for analysis: country, type and duration of exercise, number/type of subjects, control conditions, and reported outcomes. All outcomes related to QG and TC were identified and evaluated. Results: Seventy-eight RCTs met criteria. Nine outcome category groupings emerged: bone density (n=4), cardiopulmonary effects (n=19), physical function (n=16), falls and related risk factors (n=23), Quality of Life (n=17), self-efficacy (n=8), patient reported outcomes (n=13), psychological symptoms (n=27), and immune function (n=6). Many studies reported significant responses to these forms of MM compared to an inactive control. Failure to achieve significance generally was associated with active controls with intervention elements expected to achieve similar results, very small numbers of participants, severe chronic illness, or weak MM intervention (e.g., short duration). Studies did not consistently report sufficient dosing information to allow a meaningful meta-analysis. Very few studies cited prior research with relative forms of MM that may have supported or explained results. Conclusions: Many patient populations including various geographic regions, age groups, and disease categories have been shown to benefit from TC and QG in 9 different categories of outcomes. It is time to look beyond our current models of physical activity/exercise and embrace the MM constructs in Nursing care to help transition frail, fatigued, and chronic sufferers of pain into a more active lifestyle while reaping benefits previously thought to only accrue to those practicing more vigorous exercises. Practice Implications: Participants will participate in discussions to plan appropriate recommendations and referrals for MM, including TC and QG, for building health among selected, most-likely-to-benefit populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:01:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:01:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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