Parents' Experiences Following Children's Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157607
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parents' Experiences Following Children's Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Abstract:
Parents' Experiences Following Children's Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Roscigno, Cecelia I., PhD, RN, CNRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago, Women, Children and Family Health Science
Title:Irving Harris Foundation Post-doctoral Research Fellow University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:904 S. 37th Place, Renton, WA, 98055, USA
Contact Telephone:425-301-1281
Co-Authors:Kristen Swanson, PhD, RN, FAAN, UWMC Term Professor in Nursing Leadership & Chair
Aims: The purpose of this descriptive phenomenological investigation was to depict the common experiences of a group of parents whose children were diagnosed with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) within the prior five years. Rationale: Moderate to severe TBI is the leading cause of a heterogeneous range of impairments in children. Changes in the child's functioning can strain their entire family's emotional, physical, social, and economic well-being. Little is understood, however, about the common social factors that influence this progression because few qualitative investigations of the impact of children's TBI on family functioning have been conducted. Methods: IRB approval was obtained and maintained. Maximum variation purposeful sampling techniques were used to select children with moderate to severe TBI. At least one of each child's parents was interviewed to learn about their experiences parenting a child post-TBI. Participants included 42 parents of 39 children from 13 of the 50 United States. They participated in two semi-structured interviews within the first five years after their child's injuries. First interviews were always in person and occurred within 4 to 36 months after injury (M = 15.5 months, SD = 9.8 months). Second interviews (N = 33 parents of 39 children) occurred from 12 to 15 months following their first interviews and were done in person or by phone. Second interviews allowed for validation of the proposed descriptive model and updating of parents' experiences. The parent model was revised based on participant feedback. Results: Parents' experiences initially involved adjusting to their child's tenuous health condition and grieving the loss of the child they once knew. Parents with severely injured children were emotionally overwhelmed by their child's injuries and the unsupportive encounters they sometimes experienced following their children's injuries. They felt ill prepared to grasp the amount and type of information they were expected to understand and overwhelmed as they struggled to manage the functional changes in their children. The essence of parents' experiences were described as: 1) grateful to still have my child; 2) grieving for the child I knew; 3) running on nerves; and 4) grappling to get what your child and family need. Parents reported many social barriers as a consequence of others' insensitivities to their children's and families' plight. Implications: More qualitative inquiry is needed to understand how the knowledge and attitudes of others, regarding TBI, influences social interactions with traumatically brain injured children and their parents, and ultimately how these interactions affect the family's health and well-being. Education is needed to help others understand and support families of children following TBI, in a caring and unbiased manner.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParents' Experiences Following Children's Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157607-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parents' Experiences Following Children's Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roscigno, Cecelia I., PhD, RN, CNRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago, Women, Children and Family Health Science</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Irving Harris Foundation Post-doctoral Research Fellow University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">904 S. 37th Place, Renton, WA, 98055, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">425-301-1281</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">graymtr@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kristen Swanson, PhD, RN, FAAN, UWMC Term Professor in Nursing Leadership &amp; Chair</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: The purpose of this descriptive phenomenological investigation was to depict the common experiences of a group of parents whose children were diagnosed with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) within the prior five years. Rationale: Moderate to severe TBI is the leading cause of a heterogeneous range of impairments in children. Changes in the child's functioning can strain their entire family's emotional, physical, social, and economic well-being. Little is understood, however, about the common social factors that influence this progression because few qualitative investigations of the impact of children's TBI on family functioning have been conducted. Methods: IRB approval was obtained and maintained. Maximum variation purposeful sampling techniques were used to select children with moderate to severe TBI. At least one of each child's parents was interviewed to learn about their experiences parenting a child post-TBI. Participants included 42 parents of 39 children from 13 of the 50 United States. They participated in two semi-structured interviews within the first five years after their child's injuries. First interviews were always in person and occurred within 4 to 36 months after injury (M = 15.5 months, SD = 9.8 months). Second interviews (N = 33 parents of 39 children) occurred from 12 to 15 months following their first interviews and were done in person or by phone. Second interviews allowed for validation of the proposed descriptive model and updating of parents' experiences. The parent model was revised based on participant feedback. Results: Parents' experiences initially involved adjusting to their child's tenuous health condition and grieving the loss of the child they once knew. Parents with severely injured children were emotionally overwhelmed by their child's injuries and the unsupportive encounters they sometimes experienced following their children's injuries. They felt ill prepared to grasp the amount and type of information they were expected to understand and overwhelmed as they struggled to manage the functional changes in their children. The essence of parents' experiences were described as: 1) grateful to still have my child; 2) grieving for the child I knew; 3) running on nerves; and 4) grappling to get what your child and family need. Parents reported many social barriers as a consequence of others' insensitivities to their children's and families' plight. Implications: More qualitative inquiry is needed to understand how the knowledge and attitudes of others, regarding TBI, influences social interactions with traumatically brain injured children and their parents, and ultimately how these interactions affect the family's health and well-being. Education is needed to help others understand and support families of children following TBI, in a caring and unbiased manner.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:01:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:01:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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