2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157611
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interference of Pain With Activity in Patients With End-Stage Liver Disease
Abstract:
Interference of Pain With Activity in Patients With End-Stage Liver Disease
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Ryan, Amanda C., BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health & Science University
Title:Graduate Student
Contact Address:3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA
Contact Telephone:503-418-1785
Co-Authors:Lissi Hansen, Assistant Professor
Purpose:  The purpose of this study is to describe the interference of pain with activity in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) at the end of life, and compare the perspectives of patients and their family members. Background:  ESLD is the 7th leading cause of death among people between the age 25 to 64, affecting people in the most productive years of their lives.   Patients with ESLD at the end of life report pain comparable to the level of pain experienced by patients with advanced lung and colon cancer1, however, little has been written about the experience of pain in patients with ESLD, especially those cared for at home by family members.  Pain is often undertreated in this population for several reasons, including the association between liver impairment and altered drug metabolism, healthcare providers' fear of complicating the liver disease, and the perception that patients with ESLD are likely to abuse pain medication because many of them have a history of substance abuse.  Assessing interference with activity can provide meaningful insight into the experience of pain and its impact on quality of life in patients with ESLD.  The inclusion of family members' perspectives is crucial because of their close involvement in patients' care, daily activities, and pain management. Methods:  In this pilot study, the Effect of Pain on Activity tool from the Wisconsin Brief Pain Questionnaire is used to measure the interference of pain with 8 activities: general activity, mood, walking ability, normal work (housework), relations with other people, sleep, enjoyment of life, and sexual activity.  Patients and their family members are asked to select a number on a scale from 0 to 10 to describe how during the past week pain has interfered with each of the 8 items.  This pilot study is part of a larger study using a prospective, longitudinal descriptive design in which a standardized pain instrument is administered once a month for 6 months. The sample will include 20 patients and 20 family members, and the results of the pilot study will include only baseline data.  Most people with ESLD are in their working years, and it affects twice as many men as women.  Therefore the sample is expected to include more men than women, mainly between the ages of 50 and 60 years old. Results:  Results from baseline data will be included in the Poster Presentation, April 22-25, 2009.  For each of the 8 activities, mean scores and standard deviations will be reported for the two groups (patients and family members).  Paired t tests will be used to compare patients' responses to their family members' responses. Implications: Understanding the impact of pain on activity is important for designing interventions that optimize quality of life in patients with ESLD toward the end of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterference of Pain With Activity in Patients With End-Stage Liver Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157611-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interference of Pain With Activity in Patients With End-Stage Liver Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ryan, Amanda C., BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health &amp; Science University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3455 SW US Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-418-1785</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ryana@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lissi Hansen, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this study is to describe the interference of pain with activity in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) at the end of life, and compare the perspectives of patients and their family members. Background:&nbsp; ESLD is the 7th leading cause of death among people between the age 25 to 64, affecting people in the most productive years of their lives.&nbsp;&nbsp; Patients with ESLD at the end of life report pain comparable to the level of pain experienced by patients with advanced lung and colon cancer1, however, little has been written about the experience of pain in patients with ESLD, especially those cared for at home by family members.&nbsp; Pain is often undertreated in this population for several reasons, including the association between liver impairment and altered drug metabolism, healthcare providers' fear of complicating the liver disease, and the perception that patients with ESLD are likely to abuse pain medication because many of them have a history of substance abuse.&nbsp; Assessing interference with activity can provide meaningful insight into the experience of pain and its impact on quality of life in patients with ESLD.&nbsp; The inclusion of family members' perspectives is crucial because of their close involvement in patients' care, daily activities, and pain management.&nbsp;Methods:&nbsp; In this pilot study, the Effect of Pain on Activity tool from the Wisconsin Brief Pain Questionnaire is used to measure the interference of pain with 8 activities: general activity, mood, walking ability, normal work (housework), relations with other people, sleep, enjoyment of life, and sexual activity.&nbsp; Patients and their family members are asked to select a number on a scale from 0 to 10 to describe how during the past week pain has interfered with each of the 8 items.&nbsp; This pilot study is part of a larger study using a prospective, longitudinal descriptive design in which a standardized pain instrument is administered once a month for 6 months. The sample will include 20 patients and 20 family members, and the results of the pilot study will include only baseline data. &nbsp;Most people with ESLD are in their working years, and it affects twice as many men as women.&nbsp; Therefore the sample is expected to include more men than women, mainly between the ages of 50 and 60 years old.&nbsp;Results:&nbsp; Results from baseline data will be included in the Poster Presentation, April 22-25, 2009. &nbsp;For each of the 8 activities, mean scores and standard deviations will be reported for the two groups (patients and family members).&nbsp; Paired t tests will be used to compare patients' responses to their family members' responses.&nbsp;Implications:&nbsp;Understanding the impact of pain on activity is important for designing interventions that optimize quality of life in patients with ESLD toward the end of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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