2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157613
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of HRQOL in Patients With T2DM and Stage 3 CKD
Abstract:
Predictors of HRQOL in Patients With T2DM and Stage 3 CKD
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sakraida, Teresa J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Mail Stop C288-18, 13120 E. 19th Avenue, Room 4310, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:303-724-8539
Co-Authors:Paul F. Cook, PhD, Assistant Professor; Michael McDermott, MD, Professor; Isaac Teitelbaum, MD, Professor
Aims: The overall goal was to characterize the self-management experiences of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD). The specific aim was to examine relationships of socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial characteristics at entry to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 6 months later. Background: T2DM is the leading cause of CKD, a pre-dialysis, staged disorder of kidney damage and function. 20 to 40 % of adults with T2DM will progress to CKD. Silent symptoms typify early CKD stages, making the need for self-management less obvious. It is known that T2DM regime adherence may forestall glomerular damage, thereby preserving kidney function and slowing or even halting progression to kidney failure. Methods: In this IRB-approved study, convenience sampling was used and subjects (N = 54) were enrolled from medical center outpatient clinics. N = 43 completed 6-month measures. Inclusion criteria entailed: (1) self-identified T2DM, (2) 18 to 85 years, and (3) stage 3 CKD based on eGFR calculation. The Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID), Chronic Illness Resources Survey (CIRS), and Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL SF-36) survey tools were completed at entry and 6 months later. HgA1c data were obtained from the medical record. Descriptive analysis of sample characteristics and survey data was conducted. Two hierarchical linear regression analyses were employed after multiple imputation for missing data, to predict physical and mental HRQOL from predictors entered in the following order: (1) sociodemographics (sex, age, and years of education), (2) diabetes-related distress, and (3) social support. Results: Subjects were treatment-experienced and included 31 men and 12 women. The mean age was 66.6 (SD = 9.3; Mdn = 69.0; 40 - 82 years) with 12 minority and 30 non-minority subjects. The mean educational level was 14.1 years (SD = 2.4; 9 - 20 years). The first block, sociodemographics, was found to explain 20% of the variation (R2 = .20) in HRQOL physical symptom scores, F (3, 39) = 3.27, p = .031. Sex was a significant predictor of HRQOL (p = .048). In the second block, diabetes-related distress explained an additional 6.5% of the variation (R2 = .265) based on the PAID. The third block, social support, did not contribute significantly to the model. In the final model, sex remained significant, and age and food-related distress approached significance as individual predictors of physical symptom HRQOL. A second regression with predictors entered in the same order showed no significant effects on mental health symptom HRQOL. Low power is a study limitation. Implications: Chronic illness requires psychosocial adjustments in order to engage fully in self-management efforts. In this study, subjects' sex was an important predictor of their physical symptom HRQOL. Males had the highest physical symptom HRQOL. Age and food-related distress are other potentially important predictors of physical HRQOL, and may be important to consider in self-management interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of HRQOL in Patients With T2DM and Stage 3 CKDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157613-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of HRQOL in Patients With T2DM and Stage 3 CKD</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sakraida, Teresa J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mail Stop C288-18, 13120 E. 19th Avenue, Room 4310, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-724-8539</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Teresa.Sakraida@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Paul F. Cook, PhD, Assistant Professor; Michael McDermott, MD, Professor; Isaac Teitelbaum, MD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: The overall goal was to characterize the self-management experiences of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD). The specific aim was to examine relationships of socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial characteristics at entry to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) 6 months later. Background: T2DM is the leading cause of CKD, a pre-dialysis, staged disorder of kidney damage and function. 20 to 40 % of adults with T2DM will progress to CKD. Silent symptoms typify early CKD stages, making the need for self-management less obvious. It is known that T2DM regime adherence may forestall glomerular damage, thereby preserving kidney function and slowing or even halting progression to kidney failure.&nbsp;Methods: In this IRB-approved study, convenience sampling was used and subjects (N = 54) were enrolled from medical center outpatient clinics. N = 43 completed 6-month measures. Inclusion criteria entailed: (1) self-identified T2DM, (2) 18 to 85 years, and (3) stage 3 CKD based on eGFR calculation. The Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID), Chronic Illness Resources Survey (CIRS), and Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL SF-36) survey tools were completed at entry and 6 months later. HgA1c data were obtained from the medical record. Descriptive analysis of sample characteristics and survey data was conducted. Two hierarchical linear regression analyses were employed after multiple imputation for missing data, to predict physical and mental HRQOL from predictors entered in the following order: (1) sociodemographics (sex, age, and years of education), (2) diabetes-related distress, and (3) social support.&nbsp;Results: Subjects were treatment-experienced and included 31 men and 12 women. The mean age was 66.6 (SD = 9.3; Mdn = 69.0; 40 - 82 years) with 12 minority and 30 non-minority subjects. The mean educational level was 14.1 years (SD = 2.4; 9 - 20 years). The first block, sociodemographics, was found to explain 20% of the variation (R2 = .20) in HRQOL physical symptom scores, F (3, 39) = 3.27, p = .031. Sex was a significant predictor of HRQOL (p = .048). In the second block, diabetes-related distress explained an additional 6.5% of the variation (R2 = .265) based on the PAID. The third block, social support, did not contribute significantly to the model. In the final model, sex remained significant, and age and food-related distress approached significance as individual predictors of physical symptom HRQOL. A second regression with predictors entered in the same order showed no significant effects on mental health symptom HRQOL. Low power is a study limitation. Implications: Chronic illness requires psychosocial adjustments in order to engage fully in self-management efforts. In this study, subjects' sex was an important predictor of their physical symptom HRQOL. Males had the highest physical symptom HRQOL. Age and food-related distress are other potentially important predictors of physical HRQOL, and may be important to consider in self-management interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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