2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157614
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Investing in Health: The Microcredit Connection
Abstract:
Investing in Health: The Microcredit Connection
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Salt, Rebekah J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC09-5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-5688, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-2375
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this project was to follow-up on a 2006 research study conducted with a Pacific Northwest microcredit organization. The aims of the project were to: 1) increase health awareness within the organization, and 2) provide health resource information to microcredit clientele. Rationale/Background: The relationship between socioeconomic status and health is well established, and research has shown that the lower an individual's socioeconomic status is, the worse his or her health will be. In a time of economic uncertainty, the number of Americans without health insurance continues to rise. Uninsured adults are more likely to report poor health status, forgo necessary care, and receive fewer health screening services. A recent study of 19 industrialized nations measured and compared trends of amenable mortality rates before the age of 75, that is, deaths from causes that are potentially preventable with effective and timely health care, such as bacterial infections, treatable cancers, and diabetes. While all countries averaged a 16 percent decline in amenable mortality rates, the United States reported a decline of only 4 percent. The authors speculated that the slow decline in U.S. amenable mortality has coincided with the increase in uninsured Americans. The motivation for this project was based on the results from a 2006 study which explored women's participation in U.S. microcredit. Several of the outcomes of that study revealed that the majority of the participants had neither health insurance nor the economic resources to sustain through a health crisis. Furthermore, time constraints often required that they place their health "on the back burner." Generally, people who join microcredit programs are low income and cannot afford health insurance. For them, an adverse health event could have dual consequences, resulting in economic and health crises. Description: The input from the microcredit organization guided this project. Over the course of 1 year, the researcher communicated regularly with the microcredit organization, which included clientele, staff, and the Board of Directors, via email, meetings, and presentations. The discussions included dialogue around health promotion and ways to disseminate health information within the organization. In general, each of the groups expressed an interest in learning more about health resources and specifically requested information about affordable health insurance for microcredit clientele. The final products were a brochure entitled Investing in Health, which included health and social resources, and a notebook containing local health insurance information. Outcomes: Five hundred copies of the brochure and five copies of the notebook, along with electronic copies of the information, were given to the organization to distribute to their various microcredit sites throughout the state. In addition, a recommendation was made to continue and sustain the project through partnerships with the local schools of nursing, public health, and medicine. Conclusions: One of the goals of Healthy People 2010 is to eliminate health disparities. The lower incomes and the lack of access to resources experienced by microcredit clientele contribute to health disparities and amenable mortality. Historically, international microcredit organizations have supported programs, specifically health programs, which improve the lives of their clientele. As a trusted presence in the community, nursing is in a position to impact the health of microcredit clientele by: 1) offering innovative solutions to complex health issues, and 2) lobbying for affordable and equitable health insurance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInvesting in Health: The Microcredit Connectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157614-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Investing in Health: The Microcredit Connection</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Salt, Rebekah J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09-5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-5688, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-2375</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rsalt@salud.unm.edu, rejosa@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this project was to follow-up on a 2006 research study conducted with a Pacific Northwest microcredit organization. The aims of the project were to: 1) increase health awareness within the organization, and 2) provide health resource information to microcredit clientele. Rationale/Background: The relationship between socioeconomic status and health is well established, and research has shown that the lower an individual's socioeconomic status is, the worse his or her health will be. In a time of economic uncertainty, the number of Americans without health insurance continues to rise. Uninsured adults are more likely to report poor health status, forgo necessary care, and receive fewer health screening services. A recent study of 19 industrialized nations measured and compared trends of amenable mortality rates before the age of 75, that is, deaths from causes that are potentially preventable with effective and timely health care, such as bacterial infections, treatable cancers, and diabetes. While all countries averaged a 16 percent decline in amenable mortality rates, the United States reported a decline of only 4 percent. The authors speculated that the slow decline in U.S. amenable mortality has coincided with the increase in uninsured Americans. The motivation for this project was based on the results from a 2006 study which explored women's participation in U.S. microcredit. Several of the outcomes of that study revealed that the majority of the participants had neither health insurance nor the economic resources to sustain through a health crisis. Furthermore, time constraints often required that they place their health &quot;on the back burner.&quot; Generally, people who join microcredit programs are low income and cannot afford health insurance. For them, an adverse health event could have dual consequences, resulting in economic and health crises. Description: The input from the microcredit organization guided this project. Over the course of 1 year, the researcher communicated regularly with the microcredit organization, which included clientele, staff, and the Board of Directors, via email, meetings, and presentations. The discussions included dialogue around health promotion and ways to disseminate health information within the organization. In general, each of the groups expressed an interest in learning more about health resources and specifically requested information about affordable health insurance for microcredit clientele. The final products were a brochure entitled Investing in Health, which included health and social resources, and a notebook containing local health insurance information. Outcomes: Five hundred copies of the brochure and five copies of the notebook, along with electronic copies of the information, were given to the organization to distribute to their various microcredit sites throughout the state. In addition, a recommendation was made to continue and sustain the project through partnerships with the local schools of nursing, public health, and medicine. Conclusions: One of the goals of Healthy People 2010 is to eliminate health disparities. The lower incomes and the lack of access to resources experienced by microcredit clientele contribute to health disparities and amenable mortality. Historically, international microcredit organizations have supported programs, specifically health programs, which improve the lives of their clientele. As a trusted presence in the community, nursing is in a position to impact the health of microcredit clientele by: 1) offering innovative solutions to complex health issues, and 2) lobbying for affordable and equitable health insurance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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