2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157616
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multifamily Group Psychoeducation Treatment for Mentally Ill Youth
Abstract:
Multifamily Group Psychoeducation Treatment for Mentally Ill Youth
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Schepp, Karen G., PhD, PMHNP-BC, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Psychosocial & Community Health
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Box 357263, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-685-3213
Co-Authors:HeeYoung Lee, PhD, PMHNP-BC, Assistant Professor
Purpose.  The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a multifamily group psychoeducation stress management treatment for mentally ill youth in which the aim was to increase family functioning, decrease stress and improve family members' attitudes. Background.  Having a mentally ill family member can be extremely stressful for families, especially when the illness is schizophrenia and the person affected is an adolescent.  For many youth, the symptoms begin with little or no warning, catching the youth and family members off guard with no preparation for what this illness is or how to deal with it.  This period when the illness is just beginning to appear, is often known as the "first break", and is typically a crisis period for the whole family.  It is well documented that it is at this time that families desperately want and need help to dealing with the crisis.  The theoretical framework supported this study derived from components of theories of stress management, family functioning, and crisis intervention. Methods. This study was a two-group randomized clinical trial with 40 families who had a youth aged 15 to 19 with schizophrenia.  Subjects included the youth and their family members, anyone in the family who was involved in the care of the mentally ill youth.  The multifamily group treatment included 152 family members with 93 in treatment group and 59 in control group.  The treatment group consisted of 49 parents and other adults such as grandparents, 24 teens with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings.  The control group consisted of 59 family members with 25 parents and older adults, 14 youth with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings.  The treatment consisted of 12 2-hour sessions with 6 intense weekly sessions followed by 6 monthly booster sessions.   Measures were Symptoms of Stress Scale, Family Adaptability & Cohesion Scale II, and Family Attitude Scale (alphas>.70 for each).  Analysis included independent and paired t-tests. Results.  Although there was no significant difference between the groups, there were significant differences noted within the treatment group over time that were not found for the control group.  The TX group showed a significant difference from baseline over the course of 12 treatments on the three major outcomes: improved family functioning (t=2.0, p=.05), improved family attitudes (t=-2.0;p=.05), and reduction in symptoms of stress experienced by the youth (t=-2.9, p=.01).  The control group did not show significant improvement over time for any of three outcomes. Implications.  The treatment was effective in helping families in the midst of crisis enhance their level of functioning and improve their attitude toward each other and decrease the level of stress experienced by the youth. Psychiatric nurses and other mental health providers are in key positions to implement stress management psychoeducation for families as part of the youth?s overall treatment.  The multifamily group approach to delivering the treatment is cost effective and provides the opportunity for families to support each other and learn how to provide a more therapeutic environment at home.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultifamily Group Psychoeducation Treatment for Mentally Ill Youthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157616-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multifamily Group Psychoeducation Treatment for Mentally Ill Youth</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schepp, Karen G., PhD, PMHNP-BC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Psychosocial &amp; Community Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357263, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-685-3213</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kschepp@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">HeeYoung Lee, PhD, PMHNP-BC, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose.&nbsp; The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a multifamily group psychoeducation stress management treatment for mentally ill youth in which the aim was to increase family functioning, decrease stress and improve family members' attitudes. Background.&nbsp; Having a mentally ill family member can be extremely stressful for families, especially when the illness is schizophrenia and the person affected is an adolescent. &nbsp;For many youth, the symptoms begin with little or no warning, catching the youth and family members off guard with no preparation for what this illness is or how to deal with it.&nbsp; This period when the illness is just beginning to appear, is often known as the &quot;first break&quot;, and is typically a crisis period for the whole family.&nbsp; It is well documented that it is at this time that families desperately want and need help to dealing with the crisis. &nbsp;The theoretical framework supported this study derived from components of theories of stress management, family functioning, and crisis intervention.&nbsp;Methods. This study was a two-group randomized clinical trial with 40 families who had a youth aged 15 to 19 with schizophrenia.&nbsp; Subjects included the youth and their family members, anyone in the family who was involved in the care of the mentally ill youth.&nbsp; The multifamily group treatment included 152 family members with 93 in treatment group and 59 in control group.&nbsp; The treatment group consisted of 49 parents and other adults such as grandparents, 24 teens with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings.&nbsp; The control group consisted of 59 family members with 25 parents and older adults, 14 youth with schizophrenia, and 20 siblings.&nbsp; The treatment consisted of 12 2-hour sessions with 6 intense weekly sessions followed by 6 monthly booster sessions.&nbsp;&nbsp; Measures were Symptoms of Stress Scale, Family Adaptability &amp; Cohesion Scale II, and Family Attitude Scale (alphas&gt;.70 for each). &nbsp;Analysis included independent and paired t-tests. Results. &nbsp;Although there was no significant difference between the groups, there were significant differences noted within the treatment group over time that were not found for the control group.&nbsp; The TX group showed a significant difference from baseline over the course of 12 treatments on the three major outcomes: improved family functioning (t=2.0, p=.05), improved family attitudes (t=-2.0;p=.05), and reduction in symptoms of stress experienced by the youth (t=-2.9, p=.01). &nbsp;The control group did not show significant improvement over time for any of three outcomes. Implications. &nbsp;The treatment was effective in helping families in the midst of crisis enhance their level of functioning and improve their attitude toward each other and decrease the level of stress experienced by the youth. Psychiatric nurses and other mental health providers are in key positions to implement stress management psychoeducation for families as part of the youth?s overall treatment. &nbsp;The multifamily group approach to delivering the treatment is cost effective and provides the opportunity for families to support each other and learn how to provide a more therapeutic environment at home.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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