2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157618
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leukocyte Measurements in Body Fluids and Tissues
Abstract:
Leukocyte Measurements in Body Fluids and Tissues
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Schneider, Barbara St. Pierre, DNSc, RN
P.I. Institution Name:UNLV, Nursing
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-1216
Background/Purpose: Leukocytes are important cellular mediators of host defense. Their measurement can indicate whether the host defense mechanism has been activated. The purpose of this paper is to discuss two major approaches used to detect and measure leukocytes in fluids and tissues: flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Measurement Description: Flow cytometry is the assay used to measure leukocytes or leukocyte subpopulations in fluids. This approach can provide information about the leukocyte response systemically or locally. The general procedure is to apply a primary antibody that will attach to an antigen present on the leukocyte. Usually, the primary antibody or related reagent will have a fluorescent tag attached to it so that the antigenantibody complex can be detected and quantified. The major equipment piece needed for this method is a flow cytometer. Immunohistochemistry is commonly used to measure leukocytes in frozen or fixed tissues, particularly in tissues from which fluid cannot be obtained. The general procedure is to apply a primary antibody that will attach to an antigen present on the leukocyte. Depending on the nature of the primary antibody and other reagents, the antigen-antibody complex or positive structures can be visualized by fluorescent or confocal microscopy or light microscopy. The major equipment pieces required for this procedure are a chemical fume hood, if hazardous reagents are used, and a microscope. The use of an image analysis program for data quantification will require a microscope with a camera and computer. Applications: In the past 5 years, flow cytometry has been used to measure leukocytes in three nursing studies. Two of these investigations examined the percentage of blood T cells and natural killer cells from women recovering from coronary artery bypass surgery or spousal caregivers. The other study measured the percentage of blood polymorphonuclear cells from rats with ischemic stroke. A recent example of using immunohistochemistry to measure leukocytes is an exercise-related muscle injury study. In this investigation, immunohistochemistry was used to determine whether there was a difference in the number of CD11b-positive leukocytes in the muscle injured by eccentric contractions in younger and older mice. Additionally, this investigation examined the expression of other leukocyte antigens: 7/4 and Ly-6G. Conclusions: Both flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry are assays that can aid in determining the activation status of host defense. Flow cytometry can provide a systemic or local indication of leukocyte involvement in the body's response to stress or other immune-related events. Immunohistochemistry assists with assessing the leukocyte response that is occurring at the tissue level.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeukocyte Measurements in Body Fluids and Tissuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157618-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leukocyte Measurements in Body Fluids and Tissues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schneider, Barbara St. Pierre, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UNLV, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 453018, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-1216</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara.stpierreschneider@unlv.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Purpose: Leukocytes are important cellular mediators of host defense. Their measurement can indicate whether the host defense mechanism has been activated. The purpose of this paper is to discuss two major approaches used to detect and measure leukocytes in fluids and tissues: flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Measurement Description: Flow cytometry is the assay used to measure leukocytes or leukocyte subpopulations in fluids. This approach can provide information about the leukocyte response systemically or locally. The general procedure is to apply a primary antibody that will attach to an antigen present on the leukocyte. Usually, the primary antibody or related reagent will have a fluorescent tag attached to it so that the antigenantibody complex can be detected and quantified. The major equipment piece needed for this method is a flow cytometer. Immunohistochemistry is commonly used to measure leukocytes in frozen or fixed tissues, particularly in tissues from which fluid cannot be obtained. The general procedure is to apply a primary antibody that will attach to an antigen present on the leukocyte. Depending on the nature of the primary antibody and other reagents, the antigen-antibody complex or positive structures can be visualized by fluorescent or confocal microscopy or light microscopy. The major equipment pieces required for this procedure are a chemical fume hood, if hazardous reagents are used, and a microscope. The use of an image analysis program for data quantification will require a microscope with a camera and computer. Applications: In the past 5 years, flow cytometry has been used to measure leukocytes in three nursing studies. Two of these investigations examined the percentage of blood T cells and natural killer cells from women recovering from coronary artery bypass surgery or spousal caregivers. The other study measured the percentage of blood polymorphonuclear cells from rats with ischemic stroke. A recent example of using immunohistochemistry to measure leukocytes is an exercise-related muscle injury study. In this investigation, immunohistochemistry was used to determine whether there was a difference in the number of CD11b-positive leukocytes in the muscle injured by eccentric contractions in younger and older mice. Additionally, this investigation examined the expression of other leukocyte antigens: 7/4 and Ly-6G. Conclusions: Both flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry are assays that can aid in determining the activation status of host defense. Flow cytometry can provide a systemic or local indication of leukocyte involvement in the body's response to stress or other immune-related events. Immunohistochemistry assists with assessing the leukocyte response that is occurring at the tissue level.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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