2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157621
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Communication Influences on Health Efforts in Home Telemonitoring
Abstract:
Communication Influences on Health Efforts in Home Telemonitoring
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shea, Kimberly, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovations
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602 496-0926
Purpose: Remote home telemonitors are used by telehealth nurses to monitor chronically ill patients' daily vital signs and symptoms. While this system of care shows promise for decreasing hospitalizations, little is known about the influence of telemonitoring on patients' management of chronic disease. The purpose of this descriptive research is to explore the relationships between telehealth nurse-patient communication and the use of telemonitoring data for daily health efforts in the home environment. Background: Several studies have shown that the use of home monitoring technology can decrease hospitalizations and resource utilization in chronically ill patients. The research evidence serves to promote an expectation that seven million people will have home telemonitoring technology in their homes by 2012. Telehealth nurses telephone patients based on the level of health risk indicated by vital sign and symptom data. Communication processes may vary from agency to agency but are commonly initiated by a high risk alert. Little is known about the contributions of the process of communications to outcomes in telemonitored chronic illness. Shea (2008) used the Social Relations Model (SRM) (Cook & Kenny, 2004) to examine multi-level effects of communication and integration of telemonitoring data on care satisfaction and self-care outcomes. Using the SRM communication and integration had significant correlations with outcomes at every level of analysis but the round robin design produced data that was difficult to interpret. The use of the Informatics Research Organization Model (IROM) (Effken, 2003) will guide a secondary data analysis of Shea's (2008) telemonitoring research. Method: Forty-three chronically ill patients and their home helpers from three western Veteran's Health Administration site participated in the original study. A secondary data analysis examined the relationships between communication and use of telemonitored data such as vital signs and symptoms for daily health care efforts (integration). Patients and telehealth nurses were asked to rate, on a 5-point scale, frequency, timeliness, and understandability of communication with each other. Patients and their home helpers were asked to rate, on a scale of 1-100, how much of the information obtained from the monitoring device they used to manage their daily care. Correlations were used to explore the strength of the relationships between variables. Results: A significant positive correlation (p<.04) exists between patients rating communication with the nurse as timely and understandable and with home helpers perceiving that the data is integrated. However, when telehealth nurses believe that communication with the patient is frequent, timely, and understandable, significant correlations (p<.00) exist with integration as perceived by the patient and home helper. Implications: Timely and understandable communication is significantly related to a combined effort of the patient and home helper to integrate telemonitored data into daily health management. Further research is needed to explore this vital combination of disease management and telemonitoring. Use of the IROM will provide an appropriate framework for exploring the intricacies of this relationship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunication Influences on Health Efforts in Home Telemonitoringen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157621-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Communication Influences on Health Efforts in Home Telemonitoring</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shea, Kimberly, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovations</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 North 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602 496-0926</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Kimberly.Shea@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Remote home telemonitors are used by telehealth nurses to monitor chronically ill patients' daily vital signs and symptoms. While this system of care shows promise for decreasing hospitalizations, little is known about the influence of telemonitoring on patients' management of chronic disease. The purpose of this descriptive research is to explore the relationships between telehealth nurse-patient communication and the use of telemonitoring data for daily health efforts in the home environment. Background: Several studies have shown that the use of home monitoring technology can decrease hospitalizations and resource utilization in chronically ill patients. The research evidence serves to promote an expectation that seven million people will have home telemonitoring technology in their homes by 2012. Telehealth nurses telephone patients based on the level of health risk indicated by vital sign and symptom data. Communication processes may vary from agency to agency but are commonly initiated by a high risk alert. Little is known about the contributions of the process of communications to outcomes in telemonitored chronic illness. Shea (2008) used the Social Relations Model (SRM) (Cook &amp; Kenny, 2004) to examine multi-level effects of communication and integration of telemonitoring data on care satisfaction and self-care outcomes. Using the SRM communication and integration had significant correlations with outcomes at every level of analysis but the round robin design produced data that was difficult to interpret. The use of the Informatics Research Organization Model (IROM) (Effken, 2003) will guide a secondary data analysis of Shea's (2008) telemonitoring research. Method: Forty-three chronically ill patients and their home helpers from three western Veteran's Health Administration site participated in the original study. A secondary data analysis examined the relationships between communication and use of telemonitored data such as vital signs and symptoms for daily health care efforts (integration). Patients and telehealth nurses were asked to rate, on a 5-point scale, frequency, timeliness, and understandability of communication with each other. Patients and their home helpers were asked to rate, on a scale of 1-100, how much of the information obtained from the monitoring device they used to manage their daily care. Correlations were used to explore the strength of the relationships between variables. Results: A significant positive correlation (p&lt;.04) exists between patients rating communication with the nurse as timely and understandable and with home helpers perceiving that the data is integrated. However, when telehealth nurses believe that communication with the patient is frequent, timely, and understandable, significant correlations (p&lt;.00) exist with integration as perceived by the patient and home helper. Implications: Timely and understandable communication is significantly related to a combined effort of the patient and home helper to integrate telemonitored data into daily health management. Further research is needed to explore this vital combination of disease management and telemonitoring. Use of the IROM will provide an appropriate framework for exploring the intricacies of this relationship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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