2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157622
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Empowerment Intervention With Homebound Older Adults
Abstract:
Health Empowerment Intervention With Homebound Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shearer, Nelma, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Associate Professor and Co-Director Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA
Contact Telephone:602-496-0779
Co-Authors:Michael Belyea, PhD, Research Professor; Julie Fleury, PhD, RN, FAAN, Hanner Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Director PhD Program
The adult U.S. population aged 65 years and older increased to 35 million in 2000, and is projected to more than double by 2030. As adults age their health needs become more complex; recognition of and access to personal resources and social contextual resources as a basis for purposeful participation in attaining health goals is essential. Our knowledge concerning effective interventions to promote attaining health and well-being goals in older adults, particularly those who are homebound, remains limited. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to pilot test the Health Empowerment Intervention (HEI) with the intent of: 1. evaluating intervention acceptability; and 2. evaluating HEI preliminary effects on the health outcome of well-being, and theoretical mediators health empowerment and goal attainment. Conceptual Basis: The HEI operationalizes the health empowerment theory, and is designed to build self-capacity, social networks, and social service utilization, to promote the attainment of health goals and associated well-being.  Health empowerment is expressive of a human health pattern of well-being, and is viewed as a relational process that emerges from the recognition of personal resources and social contextual resources. Methods: The research design was a 2 (intervention and attentional comparison) X 3 (baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks) randomized controlled trial.  Homebound older adults were randomly assigned to either the intervention group or attentional comparison group. The intervention group received a 6 week in home HEI, while the attentional comparison group received a newsletter once a week for 6 weeks focusing on health and safety issues relevant to older adults. Results: Fifty-nine older adults participated in the study. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to evaluate HEI effects on the outcome variables of goal attainment and well-being. There was a significant group by time interaction in goal attainment (F = 3.69, p =.03); with the intervention group having higher scores at 6 weeks and 12 weeks than the comparison group. There were also significant differences between the groups for well-being but only for those who were older: where the intervention group increased in well-being between 6 and 12 weeks (F = 6.47, p = .01). Implications: The HEI helped homebound older adults reach their goals which ultimately may prevent or delay the need for institutionalization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Empowerment Intervention With Homebound Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157622-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Empowerment Intervention With Homebound Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shearer, Nelma, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Co-Director Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">602-496-0779</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nelma.shearer@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Belyea, PhD, Research Professor; Julie Fleury, PhD, RN, FAAN, Hanner Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Director PhD Program</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The adult U.S. population aged 65 years and older increased to 35 million in 2000, and is projected to more than double by 2030. As adults age their health needs become more complex; recognition of and access to personal resources and social contextual resources as a basis for purposeful participation in attaining health goals is essential. Our knowledge concerning effective interventions to promote attaining health and well-being goals in older adults, particularly those who are homebound, remains limited. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to pilot test the Health Empowerment Intervention (HEI) with the intent of: 1. evaluating intervention acceptability; and 2. evaluating HEI preliminary effects on the health outcome of well-being, and theoretical mediators health empowerment and goal attainment. Conceptual Basis: The HEI operationalizes the health empowerment theory, and is designed to build self-capacity, social networks, and social service utilization, to promote the attainment of health goals and associated well-being.  Health empowerment is expressive of a human health pattern of well-being, and is viewed as a relational process that emerges from the recognition of personal resources and social contextual resources. Methods: The research design was a 2 (intervention and attentional comparison) X 3 (baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks) randomized controlled trial.  Homebound older adults were randomly assigned to either the intervention group or attentional comparison group. The intervention group received a 6 week in home HEI, while the attentional comparison group received a newsletter once a week for 6 weeks focusing on health and safety issues relevant to older adults. Results: Fifty-nine older adults participated in the study. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to evaluate HEI effects on the outcome variables of goal attainment and well-being. There was a significant group by time interaction in goal attainment (F = 3.69, p =.03); with the intervention group having higher scores at 6 weeks and 12 weeks than the comparison group. There were also significant differences between the groups for well-being but only for those who were older: where the intervention group increased in well-being between 6 and 12 weeks (F = 6.47, p = .01). Implications: The HEI helped homebound older adults reach their goals which ultimately may prevent or delay the need for institutionalization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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