2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157623
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruiting Older Adults in Fibromyalgia Research: Possibilities and Pitfalls
Abstract:
Recruiting Older Adults in Fibromyalgia Research: Possibilities and Pitfalls
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shillam, Casey R., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Portland, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:5000 N. Willamette Blvd, MSC 153, Portland, OR, 97203, USA
Contact Telephone:503-913-2972
With the aging of the population, studies focusing on older adults and aging are increasingly critical areas for research. Recruitment of older adults for research is typically associated with diseases of aging such as arthritis or cancer or issues of aging such as caregiving or maintaining physical function. However, recruitment of older adults for research in diseases not characteristically associated with aging can be more difficult. This presentation discusses the history of excluding older adults from fibromyalgia (FM) research, and the successes and challenges faced by the author in recruiting this population for FM research. FM research has historically excluded older adults or those with comorbid conditions. This lack of study is due in part to the attempts of researchers to reduce the confounding physiologic effects of aging on study outcomes. To learn the ?normal? trajectory of this disease, it was necessary to control for confounding comorbid conditions that are often present in older adults. As those that have been diagnosed with FM in their 40s and 50s over the last 20 years continue to age, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the confounding effects of aging on this disease process. The study sample was randomly drawn from the Oregon Health & Science University FM patient database and two equally-sized groups of 50 to 64 years of age and 65 years and older were invited to participate. While the database included a sufficient number of those over 65 years of age for statistical power, the two groups did not return the questionnaires equally. The older group did not return as many surveys, and the final sample consisted of twice as many in the 50 to 64 year group than in the older group. Phone calls from potential participants revealed that they had previously been excluded from FM research for a number of reasons. Either they were conditioned to believe that by the very nature of being over 65 they were not eligible for participation, or the presence of comorbidities had previously led to their exclusion in any FM research. This study shed important light on the impact of history on research participants. With newly-defined diagnostic criteria for syndromes like FM, it is necessary to understand the pathophysiology without the confounding effects of age or comorbidity. However, as the population of those 65 years and older is projected to grow to 70 million people by 2050, FM and other diseases not clearly understood pose serious health concerns for this age group. The lessons learned from this research study will be crucial to those recruiting any population of people that have excluded from research in the past.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruiting Older Adults in Fibromyalgia Research: Possibilities and Pitfallsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157623-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruiting Older Adults in Fibromyalgia Research: Possibilities and Pitfalls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shillam, Casey R., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Portland, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5000 N. Willamette Blvd, MSC 153, Portland, OR, 97203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-913-2972</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shillam@up.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With the aging of the population, studies focusing on older adults and aging are increasingly critical areas for research. Recruitment of older adults for research is typically associated with diseases of aging such as arthritis or cancer or issues of aging such as caregiving or maintaining physical function. However, recruitment of older adults for research in diseases not characteristically associated with aging can be more difficult. This presentation discusses the history of excluding older adults from fibromyalgia (FM) research, and the successes and challenges faced by the author in recruiting this population for FM research. FM research has historically excluded older adults or those with comorbid conditions. This lack of study is due in part to the attempts of researchers to reduce the confounding physiologic effects of aging on study outcomes. To learn the ?normal? trajectory of this disease, it was necessary to control for confounding comorbid conditions that are often present in older adults. As those that have been diagnosed with FM in their 40s and 50s over the last 20 years continue to age, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the confounding effects of aging on this disease process. The study sample was randomly drawn from the Oregon Health &amp; Science University FM patient database and two equally-sized groups of 50 to 64 years of age and 65 years and older were invited to participate. While the database included a sufficient number of those over 65 years of age for statistical power, the two groups did not return the questionnaires equally. The older group did not return as many surveys, and the final sample consisted of twice as many in the 50 to 64 year group than in the older group. Phone calls from potential participants revealed that they had previously been excluded from FM research for a number of reasons. Either they were conditioned to believe that by the very nature of being over 65 they were not eligible for participation, or the presence of comorbidities had previously led to their exclusion in any FM research. This study shed important light on the impact of history on research participants. With newly-defined diagnostic criteria for syndromes like FM, it is necessary to understand the pathophysiology without the confounding effects of age or comorbidity. However, as the population of those 65 years and older is projected to grow to 70 million people by 2050, FM and other diseases not clearly understood pose serious health concerns for this age group. The lessons learned from this research study will be crucial to those recruiting any population of people that have excluded from research in the past.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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