2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157625
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge
Abstract:
Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shinnick, Mary Ann, MN, ACNP-BC, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Ms.
Contact Address:5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA
Contact Telephone:626-991-2912
Co-Authors:Kulwant Dosanjh, MA, Simulation Coordinator; Lorraine Evangelista, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor
Introduction: Currently, there is a widespread shortage of clinical rotation sites for nursing students to practice clinical skills and many schools and acute care facilities have turned to Human Patient Simulation (HPS) as an educational tool. Use of HPS is common, yet its effectiveness is unclear. Therefore, the specific aims of this study were to: 1) to determine if HPS improves clinical knowledge and 2) to determine if HPS improves self-efficacy in clinical behavior in undergraduate nursing students. Methods:  Using a one group, quasi-experimental pre/post-test design, we examined 57 Master's Entry-level Clinical Nurse (MECN) program students, who were studied in groups of 10. All students completed pre-tests (Self-Efficacy for Nursing Skills Questionnaire and Clinical Knowledge Test), participated in four medical-surgical simulations (SimMan, Laerdal), attended debriefing, then completed post-tests (same as pre-tests) and an Attitude Questionnaire. Statistical analysis included T-tests, ANOVA and Chi-square analysis between pre-and post-test scores. Results: Analysis of Knowledge scores post-simulation compared to pre-simulation revealed a mean improvement of 5.6 points (p< 0.001).  Analysis of self-efficacy showed a mean improvement in all measured areas of 4 points. Though improvement in scores was seen in 33 (56.9%) subjects, there was no change in 6 (10.3%) and worse scores in 18 (31%) subjects. (p<0.001). Conclusion:  Findings reveal more questions than answers about the efficacy of HPS. Thus, a larger, more refined study is currently underway. It is designed as a quasi-experimental, pre-test/post-test cross-over design done at three different nursing schools using 75 generic undergraduate nursing students. The goals of this study are to determine if HPS improves critical thinking in an acute care situation (detection, evaluation, and treatment of heart failure) and what aspect of HPS (student hands-on activities with the simulator or in the debriefing period with the instructor) provides the greatest gains. We will identify what factors (HPS, baseline student characteristics) have the highest impact on clinical learning. Implications for this study include providing information on HPS efficacy to educators in both school and acute care settings, which can impact the use and implementation of this very expensive and resource-intensive training technology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledgeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157625-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Human Patient Simulation on Nursing Clinical Knowledge</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shinnick, Mary Ann, MN, ACNP-BC, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5151 State University Dr., Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">626-991-2912</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maswurm@hotmail.com, mshinni@calstatela.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kulwant Dosanjh, MA, Simulation Coordinator; Lorraine Evangelista, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Currently, there is a widespread shortage of clinical rotation sites for nursing students to practice clinical skills and many schools and acute care facilities have turned to Human Patient Simulation (HPS) as an educational tool. Use of HPS is common, yet its effectiveness is unclear. Therefore, the specific aims of this study were to: 1) to determine if HPS improves clinical knowledge and 2) to determine if HPS improves self-efficacy in clinical behavior in undergraduate nursing students. Methods:&nbsp; Using a one group, quasi-experimental pre/post-test design, we examined 57 Master's Entry-level Clinical Nurse (MECN) program students, who were studied in groups of 10. All students completed pre-tests (Self-Efficacy for Nursing Skills Questionnaire and Clinical Knowledge Test), participated in four medical-surgical simulations (SimMan, Laerdal), attended debriefing, then completed post-tests (same as pre-tests) and an Attitude Questionnaire. Statistical analysis included T-tests, ANOVA and Chi-square analysis between pre-and post-test scores. Results: Analysis of Knowledge scores post-simulation compared to pre-simulation revealed a mean improvement of 5.6 points (p&lt; 0.001).&nbsp; Analysis of self-efficacy showed a mean improvement in all measured areas of 4 points. Though improvement in scores was seen in 33 (56.9%) subjects, there was no change in 6 (10.3%) and worse scores in 18 (31%) subjects. (p&lt;0.001). Conclusion: &nbsp;Findings reveal more questions than answers about the efficacy of HPS. Thus, a larger, more refined study is currently underway. It is designed as a quasi-experimental, pre-test/post-test cross-over design done at three different nursing schools using 75 generic undergraduate nursing students. The goals of this study are to determine if HPS improves critical thinking in an acute care situation (detection, evaluation, and treatment of heart failure) and what aspect of HPS (student hands-on activities with the simulator or in the debriefing period with the instructor) provides the greatest gains. We will identify what factors (HPS, baseline student characteristics) have the highest impact on clinical learning. Implications for this study include providing information on HPS efficacy to educators in both school and acute care settings, which can impact the use and implementation of this very expensive and resource-intensive training technology.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:02:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:02:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.