2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157626
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Cultural Perceptions: Foundation for IPV Interventions
Abstract:
Understanding Cultural Perceptions: Foundation for IPV Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shoultz, Jan, DrPH, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa, Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster Hall, 437, Honolulu, HI, 96744, USA
Contact Telephone:808-220-2894
Co-Authors:Lois Magnussen, EdD, APRN, Professor
Purpose/Aims: The research question is, "What are the cultural perceptions, responses and needs of selected individuals and groups served through a variety of programs that are affiliated with the three participating community health centers (CHCs) regarding IPV?" Staff at the CHCs believed they could provide more effective care for women who experienced IPV if they had information from the women whom they serve.  Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background The theoretical foundation for this study is Critical Social Theory, a post-modern philosophical perspective that acknowledges that while there are many truths and many voices to express those truths, some voices are privileged and others are marginalized.  The use of the Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach to this study is consistent with the perspective of Critical Social Theory.  An expected outcome of CBPR is the attainment of new knowledge that guides actions. Meleis (1992) suggests that individual problems cannot be separated from the broader social and political context; they are influenced and constructed by social, cultural, and historical conditions in the larger community. Methods: This descriptive study was designed in two phases (individual interviews and focus groups) using both qualitative and quantitative methods and conducted over a two year period with three cultural groups.  Both women who had, and those who had not, disclosed that they had experienced IPV who were 18 years and older participated. Analysis of qualitative data from individual interviews and focus groups was accomplished using content analysis.  Quantitative data included perceptions of the acceptability of violence and demographic data and was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The individual and group perspectives were combined and provided insights regarding the cultural group's perceptions of IPV. Results: The preliminary findings suggest that cultural perceptions and responses differ not only among the cultural groups, but in contrast to Western notions of family, male and female roles, and family life.  Protective factors that once existed in the native country of an immigrant population or in an indigenous population prior to Western contact are no longer present.  Outcomes from the study are increased knowledge of both individual and group perceptions of IPV from the three cultural groups. Groups varied in their perceptions.  IPV was a part of the childhood experience of many Native Hawaiian women and is commonly perceived to result in visible injury which requires emergent care. Chuukese women viewed IPV as directly related to their partners' marital infidelity; however, they believe the woman's role is to maintain peace within the family even when IPV is present.  Filipino women were reluctant to disclose IPV due to fear of deportation, shame, cultural shock, lack of understanding and fear of retribution to their family in the and the. Some common perceptions among the three groups were identified.  Women in all three groups experienced IPV and saw that it influenced not only their own lives, but their family and community.  External agencies including the CHCs are important to women in identifying IPV and providing resources and support. Implications: These findings are being used to develop culturally appropriate IPV interventions that will need to be tested within the three CHCs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Cultural Perceptions: Foundation for IPV Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157626-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding Cultural Perceptions: Foundation for IPV Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shoultz, Jan, DrPH, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster Hall, 437, Honolulu, HI, 96744, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">808-220-2894</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shoultz@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lois Magnussen, EdD, APRN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The research question is, &quot;What are the cultural perceptions, responses and needs of selected individuals and groups served through a variety of programs that are affiliated with the three participating community health centers (CHCs) regarding IPV?&quot; Staff at the CHCs believed they could provide more effective care for women who experienced IPV if they had information from the women whom they serve.&nbsp; Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background The theoretical foundation for this study is Critical Social Theory, a post-modern philosophical perspective that acknowledges that while there are many truths and many voices to express those truths, some voices are privileged and others are marginalized.&nbsp; The use of the Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach to this study is consistent with the perspective of Critical Social Theory.&nbsp; An expected outcome of CBPR is the attainment of new knowledge that guides actions. Meleis (1992) suggests that individual problems cannot be separated from the broader social and political context; they are influenced and constructed by social, cultural, and historical conditions in the larger community. Methods: This descriptive study was designed in two phases (individual interviews and focus groups) using both qualitative and quantitative methods and conducted over a two year period with three cultural groups.&nbsp; Both women who had, and those who had not, disclosed that they had experienced IPV who were 18 years and older participated. Analysis of qualitative data from individual interviews and focus groups was accomplished using content analysis.&nbsp; Quantitative data included perceptions of the acceptability of violence and demographic data and was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The individual and group perspectives were combined and provided insights regarding the cultural group's perceptions of IPV. Results: The preliminary findings suggest that cultural perceptions and responses differ not only among the cultural groups, but in contrast to Western notions of family, male and female roles, and family life.&nbsp; Protective factors that once existed in the native country of an immigrant population or in an indigenous population prior to Western contact are no longer present.&nbsp; Outcomes from the study are increased knowledge of both individual and group perceptions of IPV from the three cultural groups. Groups varied in their perceptions.&nbsp; IPV was a part of the childhood experience of many Native Hawaiian women and is commonly perceived to result in visible injury which requires emergent care. Chuukese women viewed IPV as directly related to their partners' marital infidelity; however, they believe the woman's role is to maintain peace within the family even when IPV is present.&nbsp; Filipino women were reluctant to disclose IPV due to fear of deportation, shame, cultural shock, lack of understanding and fear of retribution to their family in the and the. Some common perceptions among the three groups were identified.&nbsp; Women in all three groups experienced IPV and saw that it influenced not only their own lives, but their family and community.&nbsp; External agencies including the CHCs are important to women in identifying IPV and providing resources and support. Implications: These findings are being used to develop culturally appropriate IPV interventions that will need to be tested within the three CHCs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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