2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157627
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CAM Health Literacy: Development of a Conceptual Model
Abstract:
CAM Health Literacy: Development of a Conceptual Model
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shreffler-Grant, Jean, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing, Missoula Campus
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:32 Campus Dirive, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2540
Co-Authors:Bette Ide, PhD, RN, Professor; Elizabeth G. Nichols, DNS, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor; Clarann Weinert, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Purpose:  To describe the process of developing a conceptual model of health literacy in relation to the use of complementary and alternative therapy (CAM) and to describe the components of the MSU Conceptual Model of CAM Health Literacy. Background:  For today's health care consumers, adequate health literacy is necessary to understand and evaluate the volume of information regarding allopathic health care. It is perhaps even more important for evaluating CAM approaches, the use of which has grown exponentially in the last ten years. Individuals are less likely to receive professional instructions and advice for health care decision-making and action-taking regarding CAM. Studies have found that often there is limited communication among consumers and providers about the vast array of therapies available for health promotion and illness treatment, thus the use of CAM therapies is often self determined.  These products are less regulated or controlled by governmental agencies or allopathic providers, raising questions of quality and safety. The Institute of Medicine noted that there has been very little research on how American consumers obtain, understand, and evaluate information about CAM.  Description: Using the literature and prior work regarding CAM, the team developed a working definition of CAM health literacy -- the essential information about CAM needed to make informed self management decisions regarding health.  Likewise, the team identified the antecedents to CAM health literacy (environment, information seeking, health/illness trajectory, and general health literacy), the concepts that comprise CAM health literacy (dose effect, safety, and availability), and the overall outcome (informed self-management of health). The MSU Conceptual Model of CAM Health Literacy was refined based on input, through the use of e-mail and teleconferencing, from a panel of national experts on CAM, health literacy, and CAM use. Outcomes:  Through the generosity of experts, the MSU Conceptual Model of CAM Health Literacy was revised and clarified. The voluntary participation of a panel of experts was critical to the successful refinement of the model, clarification of the definitions of concepts, and identification of the empirical indicators. Conclusions: This more solid and refined conceptual model is being used to develop an instrument to measure CAM Health Literacy with a focus on biologically based products.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCAM Health Literacy: Development of a Conceptual Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157627-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">CAM Health Literacy: Development of a Conceptual Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shreffler-Grant, Jean, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing, Missoula Campus</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">32 Campus Dirive, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2540</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeansh@montana.edu, chr2741@blackfoot.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bette Ide, PhD, RN, Professor; Elizabeth G. Nichols, DNS, RN, FAAN, Dean and Professor; Clarann Weinert, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp; To describe the process of developing a conceptual model of health literacy in relation to the use of complementary and alternative therapy (CAM) and to describe the components of the MSU Conceptual Model of CAM Health Literacy. Background:&nbsp; For today's health care consumers, adequate health literacy is necessary to understand and evaluate the volume of information regarding allopathic health care. It is perhaps even more important for evaluating CAM approaches, the use of which has grown exponentially in the last ten years. Individuals are less likely to receive professional instructions and advice for health care decision-making and action-taking regarding CAM. Studies have found that often there is limited communication among consumers and providers about the vast array of therapies available for health promotion and illness treatment, thus the use of CAM therapies is often self determined.&nbsp; These products are less regulated or controlled by governmental agencies or allopathic providers, raising questions of quality and safety. The Institute of Medicine noted that there has been very little research on how American consumers obtain, understand, and evaluate information about CAM.&nbsp; Description: Using the literature and prior work regarding CAM, the team developed a working definition of CAM health literacy -- the essential information about CAM needed to make informed self management decisions regarding health.&nbsp; Likewise, the team identified the antecedents to CAM health literacy (environment, information seeking, health/illness trajectory, and general health literacy), the concepts that comprise CAM health literacy (dose effect, safety, and availability), and the overall outcome (informed self-management of health). The MSU Conceptual Model of CAM Health Literacy was refined based on input, through the use of e-mail and teleconferencing, from a panel of national experts on CAM, health literacy, and CAM use.&nbsp;Outcomes: &nbsp;Through the generosity of experts, the MSU Conceptual Model of CAM Health Literacy was revised and clarified. The voluntary participation of a panel of experts was critical to the successful refinement of the model, clarification of the definitions of concepts, and identification of the empirical indicators. Conclusions: This more solid and refined conceptual model is being used to develop an instrument to measure CAM Health Literacy with a focus on biologically based products.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.