2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157629
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concept Analysis of Social Support as Related to Breastfeeding
Abstract:
Concept Analysis of Social Support as Related to Breastfeeding
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Shviraga, Bonita A., RN, CNM, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver; The Medical Center of Aurora, Aurora Nurse-Midwives
Title:Certified Nurse-Midwife, PhD student
Contact Address:245 Hoover Ave., Louisville, CO, 80027, USA
Contact Telephone:720-352-5346
Aim: The aim of this investigation is to conduct a concept clarification of social support utilizing Walker & Avant's method of concept analysis, and to provide an in-depth concept analysis of social support as it relates to the woman?s breastfeeding experience. Definition of Concept: Social support defined specifically for breastfeeding is a well-intentioned act directed toward the breastfeeding mother by a person with whom she has a personal relationship that results in a positive response from the mother. Internal Consistency of the Concept: Critical attributes of social support in breastfeeding are: positive tangible or intangible aid given freely by family or friends, reciprocal and mutual relationship between provider of aid and breastfeeding mother, aid viewed as positive by mother, interaction between provider and mother, and a supportive environment. Antecedents to breastfeeding social support include critical life transition of birth, lactation difficulty, guilt, confusion, doubt, feelings of inadequacy, insecurity, and knowledge deficit (Moore & Coty, 2006). Consequences of breastfeeding support may be successful breastfeeding, desire to breastfeed, shared understanding, increased self-efficacy, identity as mother  strengthened, increased self-esteem, less guilt, knowledge, increased intimacy with provider of support. Logic Linking Concept to Practice: Social support is a partially-developed concept that is referred to extensively in nursing theories and praxis. The concept of social support is also used by various other disciplines such as sociology, psychology, and medicine. Breastfeeding literature and research often discuss assessment and importance of social support for breastfeeding. Since current breastfeeding initiation and continuation rates in the United States are below Health People 2010 goals, it is important to clarify the concept of social support in relationship to initiation and continuation of breastfeeding. Conclusions: This review of the literature and concept clarification of social support and social support specifically related to breastfeeding provides useful information to direct nursing practice. Borderline cases are common and are a target area for intervention. The borderline case illustrates that more is needed than verbal support of breastfeeding. It identifies a need to work with partners and family to identify concrete ways to support the breastfeeding mother. The contrary case presents a major challenge for nursing. Change through nursing intervention is difficult to achieve if family is not present or if there are larger relationship and family dynamic issues in an unsupportive relationship. This concept analysis also identifies areas for further research. A historical analysis of changes in social support for breastfeeding over time may reveal outdated methods or methods that need further development or improvement. Investigations of social support during breastfeeding from developmental and cultural lenses are warranted. Optimal environments for supportive breastfeeding need further investigation as well as timing and type of support throughout the lactation experience. Investigation of the interaction of relationships, environment, and psychological and emotional factors to breastfeeding support may provide further insight into social support during breastfeeding. This analysis also provides a foundation for development of a theoretical model of optimal breastfeeding.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcept Analysis of Social Support as Related to Breastfeedingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157629-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Concept Analysis of Social Support as Related to Breastfeeding</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shviraga, Bonita A., RN, CNM, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver; The Medical Center of Aurora, Aurora Nurse-Midwives</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Certified Nurse-Midwife, PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">245 Hoover Ave., Louisville, CO, 80027, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">720-352-5346</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bonita.shviraga@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: The aim of this investigation is to conduct a concept clarification of social support utilizing Walker &amp; Avant's method of concept analysis, and to provide an in-depth concept analysis of social support as it relates to the woman?s breastfeeding experience. Definition of Concept: Social support defined specifically for breastfeeding is a well-intentioned act directed toward the breastfeeding mother by a person with whom she has a personal relationship that results in a positive response from the mother. Internal Consistency of the Concept: Critical attributes of social support in breastfeeding are: positive tangible or intangible aid given freely by family or friends, reciprocal and mutual relationship between provider of aid and breastfeeding mother, aid viewed as positive by mother, interaction between provider and mother, and a supportive environment. Antecedents to breastfeeding social support include critical life transition of birth, lactation difficulty, guilt, confusion, doubt, feelings of inadequacy, insecurity, and knowledge deficit (Moore &amp; Coty, 2006). Consequences of breastfeeding support may be successful breastfeeding, desire to breastfeed, shared understanding, increased self-efficacy, identity as mother&nbsp; strengthened, increased self-esteem, less guilt, knowledge, increased intimacy with provider of support. Logic Linking Concept to Practice: Social support is a partially-developed concept that is referred to extensively in nursing theories and praxis. The concept of social support is also used by various other disciplines such as sociology, psychology, and medicine. Breastfeeding literature and research often discuss assessment and importance of social support for breastfeeding. Since current breastfeeding initiation and continuation rates in the United States are below Health People 2010 goals, it is important to clarify the concept of social support in relationship to initiation and continuation of breastfeeding. Conclusions: This review of the literature and concept clarification of social support and social support specifically related to breastfeeding provides useful information to direct nursing practice. Borderline cases are common and are a target area for intervention. The borderline case illustrates that more is needed than verbal support of breastfeeding. It identifies a need to work with partners and family to identify concrete ways to support the breastfeeding mother. The contrary case presents a major challenge for nursing. Change through nursing intervention is difficult to achieve if family is not present or if there are larger relationship and family dynamic issues in an unsupportive relationship. This concept analysis also identifies areas for further research. A historical analysis of changes in social support for breastfeeding over time may reveal outdated methods or methods that need further development or improvement. Investigations of social support during breastfeeding from developmental and cultural lenses are warranted. Optimal environments for supportive breastfeeding need further investigation as well as timing and type of support throughout the lactation experience. Investigation of the interaction of relationships, environment, and psychological and emotional factors to breastfeeding support may provide further insight into social support during breastfeeding. This analysis also provides a foundation for development of a theoretical model of optimal breastfeeding.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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