2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157630
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using High Fidelity Simulation to Enhance Rural Nursing Education
Abstract:
Using High Fidelity Simulation to Enhance Rural Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sideras, Stephanie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1250 Siskiyou Boulevard, Ashland, OR, 97520, USA
Contact Telephone:541-552-6249
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this paper is to present how a rural school of nursing faced the challenges of limited clinical experience through the development of a curriculum of high fidelity simulation which allows faculty to directly observe student work and structure both the content and situational complexity to meet the learning needs of students. Rationale/Background: High fidelity simulation plays a vital role in meeting the challenges of rural nursing education programs. A school of nursing operating within a rural setting faces specific challenges related to access to patients in the clinical setting and also faculty supervision and evaluation of student performance. The wide geographic distribution of clinical practice sites limits the amount of faculty contact with students. Rural hospitals, nursing homes, health departments, and other agencies may have smaller patient populations and variable censuses decreasing the likelihood that students will encounter specific types of patient populations that provide essential learning experiences (e.g., children who are ill, women experiencing childbirth, terminal patients requiring endof- life care). Brief Description of the Undertaking: Integration of simulation into the curriculum initiated using a faculty champion model. Two faculty were funded for development regarding use of the highly technological manikin as well as the educational methods specific to simulation. It was expected these faculty would lead in the development of simulation scenarios, demonstrate this method of teaching, and subsequently teach other faculty. Outcomes: Within one year, simulation use expanded to engage all clinical faculty. The addition of a simulation technician to maintain the audiovisual data was essential. The deep, rich information about student clinical capabilities that is apparent to educators as they watch students work in a high fidelity simulation was effective in gaining faculty approval for this use of student clinical time. Faculty found the high fidelity nature of simulation facilitated their evaluation of the student's development of clinical judgment. Simulation is now a component of every clinical course with students typically participating in three sessions, caring for nine patients, per quarter. Scheduling is linked by clinical group and faculty. Use has expanded beyond the manikin to support student learning needs at any point it becomes difficult for faculty to find effective learning experiences' such as using standardized patients to present mental health alterations, or designing challenging interdisciplinary conversations. Simulation is also used to support learning when the complexity and pace of the clinical setting requires the student to enter with a higher level of experiences' such as a health screening fair. Conclusions: Use of tailored clinical cases in the high fidelity simulation laboratory allows faculty to structure both the content and situational complexity to meet the learning needs of students, and to directly observe student performance. This is particularly essential for rural schools of nursing when student practicum experiences may be limited. The high fidelity nature of the experience is helpful for clinical faculty assessment of student clinical judgment ability and further design of student education practice experiences. While the use of advanced technology as a teaching tool does require attention to faculty support and ongoing development, the perceived benefits of simulation education has kept faculty engaged in implementation of the method throughout the undergraduate curriculum.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing High Fidelity Simulation to Enhance Rural Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157630-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using High Fidelity Simulation to Enhance Rural Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sideras, Stephanie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Oregon Health and Science University, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1250 Siskiyou Boulevard, Ashland, OR, 97520, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">541-552-6249</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">siderast@ohsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this paper is to present how a rural school of nursing faced the challenges of limited clinical experience through the development of a curriculum of high fidelity simulation which allows faculty to directly observe student work and structure both the content and situational complexity to meet the learning needs of students. Rationale/Background: High fidelity simulation plays a vital role in meeting the challenges of rural nursing education programs. A school of nursing operating within a rural setting faces specific challenges related to access to patients in the clinical setting and also faculty supervision and evaluation of student performance. The wide geographic distribution of clinical practice sites limits the amount of faculty contact with students. Rural hospitals, nursing homes, health departments, and other agencies may have smaller patient populations and variable censuses decreasing the likelihood that students will encounter specific types of patient populations that provide essential learning experiences (e.g., children who are ill, women experiencing childbirth, terminal patients requiring endof- life care). Brief Description of the Undertaking: Integration of simulation into the curriculum initiated using a faculty champion model. Two faculty were funded for development regarding use of the highly technological manikin as well as the educational methods specific to simulation. It was expected these faculty would lead in the development of simulation scenarios, demonstrate this method of teaching, and subsequently teach other faculty. Outcomes: Within one year, simulation use expanded to engage all clinical faculty. The addition of a simulation technician to maintain the audiovisual data was essential. The deep, rich information about student clinical capabilities that is apparent to educators as they watch students work in a high fidelity simulation was effective in gaining faculty approval for this use of student clinical time. Faculty found the high fidelity nature of simulation facilitated their evaluation of the student's development of clinical judgment. Simulation is now a component of every clinical course with students typically participating in three sessions, caring for nine patients, per quarter. Scheduling is linked by clinical group and faculty. Use has expanded beyond the manikin to support student learning needs at any point it becomes difficult for faculty to find effective learning experiences' such as using standardized patients to present mental health alterations, or designing challenging interdisciplinary conversations. Simulation is also used to support learning when the complexity and pace of the clinical setting requires the student to enter with a higher level of experiences' such as a health screening fair. Conclusions: Use of tailored clinical cases in the high fidelity simulation laboratory allows faculty to structure both the content and situational complexity to meet the learning needs of students, and to directly observe student performance. This is particularly essential for rural schools of nursing when student practicum experiences may be limited. The high fidelity nature of the experience is helpful for clinical faculty assessment of student clinical judgment ability and further design of student education practice experiences. While the use of advanced technology as a teaching tool does require attention to faculty support and ongoing development, the perceived benefits of simulation education has kept faculty engaged in implementation of the method throughout the undergraduate curriculum.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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