2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Adults' Participation in Healthy Behaviors and Preventive Screening
Abstract:
Older Adults' Participation in Healthy Behaviors and Preventive Screening
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Silva-Smith, Amy, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, PO Box 7150, Colorado Springs, CO, 80933, USA
Contact Telephone:719-255-4490
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to gain understanding of older adults' self-perception of aging successfully and their participation in healthy behaviors and preventive screening. Background: Debate is ongoing with regard to the best way to operationally define successful aging. Objective variables associated with physical and cognitive function have been traditionally used to measure successful aging. Recently, more emphasis has been placed on older adults' own perceptions of whether or not they are aging in a successful manner. Methods: For this study, self-perception of aging successfully was measured using two items. A survey design was used for this sample and recruited from three primary care clinics. The three clinics included two nurse practitioner [NP] only practices and one NP/MD collaborative practice. Healthy behaviors included exercise, breakfast, tobacco, alcohol, and seatbelt use. Preventive screening included immunizations (influenza, pneumonia, tetanus), screening tests (PAP, mammogram, PSA, digital prostate exam, colonoscopy), and screening examinations (skin, dental, vision). Data analyses used to answer the research questions included frequencies and descriptive statistics. Results: The sample size was 205 adults aged 60 and older; 76 were men and 129 were women. The mean age of participants was 70.5 years old with a range of 60 to 95 and eighty-five percent were white/non Hispanic. Nearly twenty-four percent reported that their income was inadequate or marginal. The majority of participants resided with a spouse or partner and the majority were married. Most were retired (71%); however, twenty-two percent were working either full or part-time. Fifty-four percent of participants reported that the statement "I am aging well" was "mostly true". When asked, On a scale of 1 (least successful) to 10 (most successful) how well do you believe you are aging?, the mean response was 7.54 (SD=2.076; n=202). Only eight percent reported being current smokers and the number of nonsmokers and past smokers were equal at forty-five percent in each group. Twenty-six percent had not received an influenza vaccine in the past year and thirty-one percent had not had a dental exam in the past year. Limitations of the study are discussed. Implications: It is important for health care providers to understand older adults' participation in both preventive screening and healthy behaviors. Based upon the findings of this study, participation in prevention does not meet current clinical recommendations. Health care policy may be impacted by the current state of participation in healthy behaviors and preventive screening by older adults. It is also crucial for health care providers to learn more about how older adults view their own degree of aging successfully. By increasing knowledge of older adults' perceptions and behaviors, health care providers may be able to assess and intervene more effectively. Further research is needed to develop interventions that engage older adults in participation of health behaviors and prevention. The current study is intended to contribute to the knowledge that will lead to innovations in these efforts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Adults' Participation in Healthy Behaviors and Preventive Screeningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Adults' Participation in Healthy Behaviors and Preventive Screening</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Silva-Smith, Amy, PhD, APRN, BC, ANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, PO Box 7150, Colorado Springs, CO, 80933, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">719-255-4490</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">asilvasm@uccs.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to gain understanding of older adults' self-perception of aging successfully and their participation in healthy behaviors and preventive screening. Background: Debate is ongoing with regard to the best way to operationally define successful aging. Objective variables associated with physical and cognitive function have been traditionally used to measure successful aging. Recently, more emphasis has been placed on older adults' own perceptions of whether or not they are aging in a successful manner. Methods: For this study, self-perception of aging successfully was measured using two items. A survey design was used for this sample and recruited from three primary care clinics. The three clinics included two nurse practitioner [NP] only practices and one NP/MD collaborative practice. Healthy behaviors included exercise, breakfast, tobacco, alcohol, and seatbelt use. Preventive screening included immunizations (influenza, pneumonia, tetanus), screening tests (PAP, mammogram, PSA, digital prostate exam, colonoscopy), and screening examinations (skin, dental, vision). Data analyses used to answer the research questions included frequencies and descriptive statistics. Results: The sample size was 205 adults aged 60 and older; 76 were men and 129 were women. The mean age of participants was 70.5 years old with a range of 60 to 95 and eighty-five percent were white/non Hispanic. Nearly twenty-four percent reported that their income was inadequate or marginal. The majority of participants resided with a spouse or partner and the majority were married. Most were retired (71%); however, twenty-two percent were working either full or part-time. Fifty-four percent of participants reported that the statement &quot;I am aging well&quot; was &quot;mostly true&quot;. When asked, On a scale of 1 (least successful) to 10 (most successful) how well do you believe you are aging?, the mean response was 7.54 (SD=2.076; n=202). Only eight percent reported being current smokers and the number of nonsmokers and past smokers were equal at forty-five percent in each group. Twenty-six percent had not received an influenza vaccine in the past year and thirty-one percent had not had a dental exam in the past year. Limitations of the study are discussed. Implications: It is important for health care providers to understand older adults' participation in both preventive screening and healthy behaviors. Based upon the findings of this study, participation in prevention does not meet current clinical recommendations. Health care policy may be impacted by the current state of participation in healthy behaviors and preventive screening by older adults. It is also crucial for health care providers to learn more about how older adults view their own degree of aging successfully. By increasing knowledge of older adults' perceptions and behaviors, health care providers may be able to assess and intervene more effectively. Further research is needed to develop interventions that engage older adults in participation of health behaviors and prevention. The current study is intended to contribute to the knowledge that will lead to innovations in these efforts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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