2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157635
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Burnout in Oncology Nurses
Abstract:
A Comparison of Burnout in Oncology Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sorensen, Celeste, BSN, OCN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Luke's Regional Medical Center, 4 South, Oncology
Title:RN
Contact Address:190 E. Bannock, Boise, ID, 83712, USA
Contact Telephone:208-381-2510
Co-Authors:Shoni Davis, DNSc, RN; Courtney Flynn, RN, BSN, CPON
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the presence of burnout in oncology nurses working in adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient settings at St. Luke's Regional Medical Center and examine the extent to which demographic factors influence burnout in this population. Background: Burnout is a gradual process beginning with enthusiasm, advancing to stagnation, augmenting to frustration, and ultimately resulting in apathy (Lewis, 1999). Nurses suffering from burnout experience a decline in quality of work, conflict with colleagues, indifference and cynicism towards patients, increased alcohol intake, family pressure, relationship breakdowns, and increased irritability (Quattrin et al., 2006). Nurses who work in oncology are at an increased risk for burnout because of the intense and ongoing losses inherent to oncology nursing (Lewis, 1999). The majority of literature on burnout focuses on the presence of burnout in a single nursing unit; however there is a gap in the literature when comparing the presence of burnout on pediatric and adult inpatient and outpatient settings. Implications: Cancer nurses are a valuable resource and retention of oncology nurses is vitally important (Barrett, 2004). Burnout is costly, not only in turnover, but it affects quality patient care. Nurses who remain in areas where burnout is endemic have shown signs of increased rates of absenteeism and reduced productivity (Leiter, Harvie, & Frizzell, 1999). Burnout results from prolonged high levels of stress at work, and when left untreated can result in an exodus of health care works from the emotionally intense situations. Methodology: This study has received approval from the St. Luke's Regional Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The research is a descriptive, correlational study that is designed to examine the presence of burnout in oncology nurses working in inpatient and outpatient adult and pediatric oncology units.  Licensed Registered Nurses will be asked to complete three questionnaires: the Maslach Burnout Questionnaire, a questionnaire on nursing satisfaction, and a demographic data questionnaire developed by the researchers. Data will be analyzed to evaluate factors that are closely associated with burnout and also to compare levels of burnout in adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Burnout in Oncology Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157635-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison of Burnout in Oncology Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sorensen, Celeste, BSN, OCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Luke's Regional Medical Center, 4 South, Oncology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">190 E. Bannock, Boise, ID, 83712, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">208-381-2510</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">oncchick@gmail.com, sorensenc@slrmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shoni Davis, DNSc, RN; Courtney Flynn, RN, BSN, CPON</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the presence of burnout in oncology nurses working in adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient settings at St. Luke's Regional Medical Center and examine the extent to which demographic factors influence burnout in this population. Background: Burnout is a gradual process beginning with enthusiasm, advancing to stagnation, augmenting to frustration, and ultimately resulting in apathy (Lewis, 1999).&nbsp;Nurses suffering from burnout experience a decline in quality of work, conflict with colleagues, indifference and cynicism towards patients, increased alcohol intake, family pressure, relationship breakdowns, and increased irritability (Quattrin et al., 2006). Nurses who work in oncology are at an increased risk for burnout because of the intense and ongoing losses inherent to oncology nursing (Lewis, 1999). The majority of literature on burnout focuses on the presence of burnout in a single nursing unit; however there is a gap in the literature when comparing the presence of burnout on pediatric and adult inpatient and outpatient settings. Implications: Cancer nurses are a valuable resource and retention of oncology nurses is vitally important (Barrett, 2004). Burnout is costly, not only in turnover, but it affects quality patient care. Nurses who remain in areas where burnout is endemic have shown signs of increased rates of absenteeism and reduced productivity (Leiter, Harvie, &amp; Frizzell, 1999). Burnout results from prolonged high levels of stress at work, and when left untreated can result in an exodus of health care works from the emotionally intense situations. Methodology: This study has received approval from the St. Luke's Regional Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The research is a descriptive, correlational study that is designed to examine the presence of burnout in oncology nurses working in inpatient and outpatient adult and pediatric oncology units.&nbsp; Licensed Registered Nurses will be asked to complete three questionnaires: the Maslach Burnout Questionnaire, a questionnaire on nursing satisfaction, and a demographic data questionnaire developed by the researchers. Data will be analyzed to evaluate factors that are closely associated with burnout and also to compare levels of burnout in adult and pediatric inpatient and outpatient settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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