Methamphetamine Use in Pregnant and Parenting Mothers: A Grounded Theory Proposal

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157639
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methamphetamine Use in Pregnant and Parenting Mothers: A Grounded Theory Proposal
Abstract:
Methamphetamine Use in Pregnant and Parenting Mothers: A Grounded Theory Proposal
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Stemmler, Margaret Susan, MSN, MPH, FNP, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:3-365 Factor Bldg, Box 956917, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA
Contact Telephone:310-825-6892
Purpose: To explore factors that influence methamphetamine use and factors that impact the maintenance of a drug free lifestyle among pregnant and parenting women who are chemically dependent to methamphetamine as a primary drug of choice. Background:  Self-reported reasons for initiating methamphetamine use include relief of depression, weight control, or just to get high. Research about drug-using women outlines the complexity of their lives, including childhood histories of family disruption, drug-using parents, physical and sexual abuse, and psychological comorbidities. The context of the social environment for many women is that they are isolated from the social mainstream. As a drug of choice and in combination with other complementary drugs, methamphetamine use presents a public health concern that is exceptionally high for women who become pregnant and who have children in the household.  On becoming pregnant, methamphetamine using women are known to avoid or delay prenatal care, attend fewer prenatal visits, and sustain greater risk for poor pregnancy outcomes.  A drug-using lifestyle is more likely to interface with law enforcement related to violence, drug courts due to involvement in criminal activities, and child forfeiture to foster care. Whereas the threshold for neurobiological damage to mother and offspring from the effects of methamphetamine are only beginning to be understood, and treatment for methamphetamine use can be successful for highly motivated persons. The influences of pregnancy and parenting on the lives of women who use methamphetamine are considered by many to be windows of opportunity for instituting lifestyle change.  Methods: A qualitative design will be used to engage a minimum of 20 pregnant and parenting women who have used methamphetamine in a dependent pattern of use within the last 6 months, in a minimum of two semi-structured interviews during pregnancy and/or within the first year after the birth of a child.  Recruitment of participants will include outpatient and residential drug treatment facilities for women with programs that include pregnant and parenting women in Southern California, the County Health Departments for  Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and snowball contacts. The interviews will be analyzed using Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory methods to identify themes within the stories of the women's lived experiences. Demographics and selected information regarding methamphetamine initiations, patterns of use, and triggers for craving will be solicited, as well as number of attempts to terminate methamphetamine use, and relapse will be solicited. Expected Findings: Life experiences of methamphetamine users during pregnancy and in the first year post partum are expected to uncover compelling and reliable data pertaining to methamphetamine dependence behaviors and concerning their struggle to live a drug-free lifestyle as mothers with dependent children. Implications: It is expected that the experiences of these women will prompt theory development to improve provider screening techniques, support individualized clinical management, and improved treatment referrals among women who use methamphetamines.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethamphetamine Use in Pregnant and Parenting Mothers: A Grounded Theory Proposalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157639-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Methamphetamine Use in Pregnant and Parenting Mothers: A Grounded Theory Proposal</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stemmler, Margaret Susan, MSN, MPH, FNP, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3-365 Factor Bldg, Box 956917, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6917, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-825-6892</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">msstem@ucla.edu, msstemmler@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore factors that influence methamphetamine use and factors that impact the maintenance of a drug free lifestyle among pregnant and parenting women who are chemically dependent to methamphetamine as a primary drug of choice. Background: &nbsp;Self-reported reasons for initiating methamphetamine use include relief of depression, weight control, or just to get high. Research about drug-using women outlines the complexity of their lives, including childhood histories of family disruption, drug-using parents, physical and sexual abuse, and psychological comorbidities. The context of the social environment for many women is that they are isolated from the social mainstream. As a drug of choice and in combination with other complementary drugs, methamphetamine use presents a public health concern that is exceptionally high for women who become pregnant and who have children in the household. &nbsp;On becoming pregnant, methamphetamine using women are known to avoid or delay prenatal care, attend fewer prenatal visits, and sustain greater risk for poor pregnancy outcomes.&nbsp; A drug-using lifestyle is more likely to interface with law enforcement related to violence, drug courts due to involvement in criminal activities, and child forfeiture to foster care. Whereas the threshold for neurobiological damage to mother and offspring from the effects of methamphetamine are only beginning to be understood, and treatment for methamphetamine use can be successful for highly motivated persons. The influences of pregnancy and parenting on the lives of women who use methamphetamine are considered by many to be windows of opportunity for instituting lifestyle change.&nbsp; Methods: A qualitative design will be used to engage a minimum of 20 pregnant and parenting women who have used methamphetamine in a dependent pattern of use within the last 6 months, in a minimum of two semi-structured interviews during pregnancy and/or within the first year after the birth of a child.&nbsp; Recruitment of participants will include outpatient and residential drug treatment facilities for women with programs that include pregnant and parenting women in Southern California, the County Health Departments for&nbsp; Los Angeles, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, and snowball contacts. The interviews will be analyzed using Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory methods to identify themes within the stories of the women's lived experiences.&nbsp;Demographics and selected information regarding methamphetamine initiations, patterns of use, and triggers for craving will be solicited, as well as number of attempts to terminate methamphetamine use, and relapse will be solicited. Expected Findings: Life experiences of methamphetamine users during pregnancy and in the first year post partum are expected to uncover compelling and reliable data pertaining to methamphetamine dependence behaviors and concerning their struggle to live a drug-free lifestyle as mothers with dependent children. Implications: It is expected that the experiences of these women will prompt theory development to improve provider screening techniques, support individualized clinical management, and improved treatment referrals among women who use methamphetamines.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.