2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157640
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student Voices: Content Analysis of RN-BSN Progress Report Data
Abstract:
Student Voices: Content Analysis of RN-BSN Progress Report Data
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sterner, Anna, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington Bothell, Nursing
Title:Master of Nursing Student
Contact Address:18037 1st Ave. NW, Shoreline, WA, 98177, USA
Contact Telephone:206-546-1424
Co-Authors:Lena Hristova, BSN, RN, Master of Nursing Student
Background & Purpose: A team of University of Washington Bothell (UWB) MN students was asked to evaluate the new UWB RN to BSN curriculum to determine whether it was meeting the AACN Core Competencies and to measure overall student breadth and depth of competency attainment using the current progress report tool. The purpose for qualitative analysis was to answer the question: Is progress toward achievement of the twelve competencies demonstrable quarter by quarter? Approach: At the conclusion of each quarter students are asked to complete the progress report, a one page combination quantitative and qualitative instrument. The UWB program competencies are based on the AACN core competencies. Qualitative content analysis was completed using a deductive approach outlined by Elo & Kyngas (2008). The data from fall and winter quarter surveys was transcribed and broken down to the twelve competencies. Key concepts expressed as action verbs and phrases describing action were selected as the unit of analysis. A sense of the whole was obtained through several readings of the data. Structured categorization matrix was chosen using Bloom's Taxonomy (1984). Data was reviewed for content, coded into identified categories using action verbs/phrases from Bloom's taxonomy, and summarized. Findings: Evaluation of the new RN to BSN curriculum revealed that the program changes have been successful. The student evaluations indicate the courses are well aligned with the AACN competencies. Students are reporting various levels of learning across all twelve competencies. The findings revealed that knowledge, analysis, and application domains are strongly present based on the students? responses. An improvement of critical thinking skills and learning how to analyze nursing research were skills well acknowledged by the majority of the students. The concept of nursing theories was new and challenging for the majority of students. Comprehension took place as students learned to understand and apply Swanson's Caring Theory. Students applied improved communication, ability to deal with conflicts at the work place, and culturally sensitive care. Students gave evidence of learning to evaluate their own practice, values, and beliefs. A synthesis domain is present as students talked about the process of writing a scholarly paper and preparing for presentation. In addition, student learning occurred within the affective domain as students gave examples of increasing awareness and valuing of new concepts. Conclusions/Implications: Bloom's taxonomy provides an excellent framework for qualitative evaluation of student learning on a self evaluation tool. Progress during each quarter for student learning is well demonstrated within the taxonomy of Bloom. Continued improvement of the report tool, as recommended in the previous paper, can facilitate increased student responses in quantity and quality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent Voices: Content Analysis of RN-BSN Progress Report Dataen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157640-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Student Voices: Content Analysis of RN-BSN Progress Report Data</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sterner, Anna, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington Bothell, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Master of Nursing Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">18037 1st Ave. NW, Shoreline, WA, 98177, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-546-1424</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sterners2001@yahoo.com, anna.sterner@swedish.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lena Hristova, BSN, RN, Master of Nursing Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background &amp; Purpose: A team of University of Washington Bothell (UWB) MN students was asked to evaluate the new UWB RN to BSN curriculum to determine whether it was meeting the AACN Core Competencies and to measure overall student breadth and depth of competency attainment using the current progress report tool. The purpose for qualitative analysis was to answer the question: Is progress toward achievement of the twelve competencies demonstrable quarter by quarter? Approach: At the conclusion of each quarter students are asked to complete the progress report, a one page combination quantitative and qualitative instrument. The UWB program competencies are based on the AACN core competencies. Qualitative content analysis was completed using a deductive approach outlined by Elo &amp; Kyngas (2008). The data from fall and winter quarter surveys was transcribed and broken down to the twelve competencies. Key concepts expressed as action verbs and phrases describing action were selected as the unit of analysis. A sense of the whole was obtained through several readings of the data. Structured categorization matrix was chosen using Bloom's Taxonomy (1984). Data was reviewed for content, coded into identified categories using action verbs/phrases from Bloom's taxonomy, and summarized. Findings: Evaluation of the new RN to BSN curriculum revealed that the program changes have been successful. The student evaluations indicate the courses are well aligned with the AACN competencies. Students are reporting various levels of learning across all twelve competencies. The findings revealed that knowledge, analysis, and application domains are strongly present based on the students? responses. An improvement of critical thinking skills and learning how to analyze nursing research were skills well acknowledged by the majority of the students. The concept of nursing theories was new and challenging for the majority of students. Comprehension took place as students learned to understand and apply Swanson's Caring Theory. Students applied improved communication, ability to deal with conflicts at the work place, and culturally sensitive care. Students gave evidence of learning to evaluate their own practice, values, and beliefs. A synthesis domain is present as students talked about the process of writing a scholarly paper and preparing for presentation. In addition, student learning occurred within the affective domain as students gave examples of increasing awareness and valuing of new concepts. Conclusions/Implications: Bloom's taxonomy provides an excellent framework for qualitative evaluation of student learning on a self evaluation tool. Progress during each quarter for student learning is well demonstrated within the taxonomy of Bloom. Continued improvement of the report tool, as recommended in the previous paper, can facilitate increased student responses in quantity and quality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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