Exploring Food Insecurity Among Young Mothers (15-24 years) Who Are Head of Households

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157641
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Food Insecurity Among Young Mothers (15-24 years) Who Are Head of Households
Abstract:
Exploring Food Insecurity Among Young Mothers (15-24 years) Who Are Head of Households
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Stevens, Christine A., MPH, PHD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington Tacoma, Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:3849 N. Bristol Street, Tacoma, WA, 98407, USA
Contact Telephone:253-312-8689
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of food insecurity in young mothers (15 - 24 years) who are heads of households. The specific aims of this proposal were to (1). Describe the prevalence of food insecurity in a pilot sample of young mothers who are heads of households; (2) Identify factors that young mothers describe as contributing to food insecurity; (3). Describe strategies that that young mothers employ to plan for and manage food insecurity. Background: Food insecurity can contribute to health disparity in young women (15-24) who are single head of households with children in two ways. First, the stress of food insecurity can lead to compounding issues of depression for these mothers. Secondly, food choices contribute to obesity, a leading cause of diabetes, heart disease, and early mortality. The young mothers need to stretch the food budget and buy food that can be easily stored and filling; many of their choices are among the inexpensive high fat, high carbohydrates foods. These young women have different individual experiences with providing food for their families, whether they receive federal assistance or not. Currently, there is a need to explore the reasons that the young women identify for food insecurity and the strategies that they use to address it. Methods: This descriptive study utilized the food security survey (USFSS) which is an 18-item self-report questionnaire for assessing household food security. After the participants had completed this questionnaire, a semi-structured interview was conducted concerning factors contributing to food insecurity and coping strategies. Results: Twenty-one young mothers (15-24 years) who were head of households and living with their children participated in the study. Findings indicate that each of the 21 women had food insecurity in the last 30 days, whether they had federal assistance or not. The results from the USFSS survey indicated that each of the participants fluctuated between low food insecurity with some days of food insufficiency for the mothers and other adults in the household. All the women reported that due to extensive strategies on their part that their children had marginal food insecurity. The factors that contributed to food insecurity in the families of the young mothers were transportation, affordable food sources, stable affordable housing, and income.  Ten out of the 21 lived in rural areas where the closest food source was a mini market or gas station market. Strategies that the young mothers used to address food insecurity were food banks, mother skipping meals so children could eat, and storing non-perishable foods in preparation for lack of income in the future. Implications: These findings indicate that we need to move beyond the traditional ways of educating about diet and nutrition to address some of the structural barriers that influence food security and food choices. In this population, the choices about healthy food were constrained by affordable food sources, adequate income, transportation, and affordable housing. Funded by Center for the Advancement of Health Disparities Research Kaulike Pono.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Food Insecurity Among Young Mothers (15-24 years) Who Are Head of Householdsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157641-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Food Insecurity Among Young Mothers (15-24 years) Who Are Head of Households</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Christine A., MPH, PHD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington Tacoma, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3849 N. Bristol Street, Tacoma, WA, 98407, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">253-312-8689</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cstevens@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of food insecurity in young mothers (15 - 24 years) who are heads of households. The specific aims of this proposal were to (1). Describe the prevalence of food insecurity in a pilot sample of young mothers who are heads of households; (2) Identify factors that young mothers describe as contributing to food insecurity; (3). Describe strategies that that young mothers employ to plan for and manage food insecurity. Background: Food insecurity can contribute to health disparity in young women (15-24) who are single head of households with children in two ways. First, the stress of food insecurity can lead to compounding issues of depression for these mothers. Secondly, food choices contribute to obesity, a leading cause of diabetes, heart disease, and early mortality. The young mothers need to stretch the food budget and buy food that can be easily stored and filling; many of their choices are among the inexpensive high fat, high carbohydrates foods. These young women have different individual experiences with providing food for their families, whether they receive federal assistance or not. Currently, there is a need to explore the reasons that the young women identify for food insecurity and the strategies that they use to address it. Methods: This descriptive study utilized the food security survey (USFSS) which is an 18-item self-report questionnaire for assessing household food security. After the participants had completed this questionnaire, a semi-structured interview was conducted concerning factors contributing to food insecurity and coping strategies. Results: Twenty-one young mothers (15-24 years) who were head of households and living with their children participated in the study. Findings indicate that each of the 21 women had food insecurity in the last 30 days, whether they had federal assistance or not. The results from the USFSS survey indicated that each of the participants fluctuated between low food insecurity with some days of food insufficiency for the mothers and other adults in the household. All the women reported that due to extensive strategies on their part that their children had marginal food insecurity. The factors that contributed to food insecurity in the families of the young mothers were transportation, affordable food sources, stable affordable housing, and income.&nbsp; Ten out of the 21 lived in rural areas where the closest food source was a mini market or gas station market. Strategies that the young mothers used to address food insecurity were food banks, mother skipping meals so children could eat, and storing non-perishable foods in preparation for lack of income in the future. Implications: These findings indicate that we need to move beyond the traditional ways of educating about diet and nutrition to address some of the structural barriers that influence food security and food choices. In this population, the choices about healthy food were constrained by affordable food sources, adequate income, transportation, and affordable housing. Funded by Center for the Advancement of Health Disparities Research Kaulike Pono.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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