2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157643
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Social Support on Obesity in Middle School Children
Abstract:
The Relationship of Social Support on Obesity in Middle School Children
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Stevens, Carol J., MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA
Contact Telephone:480-965-1538
Co-Authors:Myunghan Choi, PhD, MPH, APRN, BC, Assistant Research Professor; Bonnie Gance-Cleveland, PhD, RNC, PNP, FAAN, Associate Professor; Wendy Ward-Begnoche, PhD, Assistant Professor
Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe the relationship between social support for healthy eating and activity and healthy weight in middle school adolescents by gender and ethnicity. Background: Obesity in youth has become a national epidemic and is worsening despite efforts to address the serious health and social consequences. Research suggests that social support by parents and peers may help adolescents in making healthy eating and activity choices, but gender and ethnic differences have been reported in the literature. Methods: A secondary data analysis of baseline data from an intervention study was used to determine relationships between social support and BMI percentile for race and gender. Social support was measured by the abbreviated Social Support and Eating Habits Survey and Social Support and Exercise Survey. Demographic characteristics of the sample were analyzed using Chi-square and t-test. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationship between BMI percentile and social support variables. A convenient sample of 258 middle school students in an urban mid-South community participated in the study. Abbreviated versions of the Social Support family eating (Alpha = .776), Social Support family exercise (Alpha = .909), Social Support friend eating (Alpha = .777), and Social Support friend exercise (Alpha = .876) Scale were used to measure social support from peers and family. Results: The results showed significant differences in social support variables for females compared to social support in males in this population. In males, BMI percentile was significantly correlated with family social support for exercise (r =.177; p < .05) and social support from friends for healthy eating (r =.178, p <.05), demonstrating that more obese males are likely to get support from both family and friends for healthy eating and exercise. In females, social support from family for healthy eating significantly correlated with BMI percentile (r = .412, p < .01), demonstrating that more obese females are more likely to get social support from family for healthy eating. In nonwhite teens, BMI percentile significantly correlated with social support from family for healthy eating (r = .158, p <.05). In white teens, BMI percentile significantly correlated with family support for healthy eating (r = .401, p < .01), family support for exercise (r = .354, p < .05) and friend support for healthy eating (r = .340, p < .05). Implications: These findings demonstrate that social support in females is different from that of males, suggesting effective obesity intervention programs targeting social support should be gender specific. In addition, the findings suggest differences in social support for ethnic groups that should be considered when developing obesity programs for specific populations. Social support to address culture and ethnic lifestyles that contribute to greater rates of obesity must have priority in obesity prevention research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Social Support on Obesity in Middle School Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157643-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Social Support on Obesity in Middle School Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Carol J., MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 N. 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-0698, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480-965-1538</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Carol.Stevens@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Myunghan Choi, PhD, MPH, APRN, BC, Assistant Research Professor; Bonnie Gance-Cleveland, PhD, RNC, PNP, FAAN, Associate Professor; Wendy Ward-Begnoche, PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of the study was to describe the relationship between social support for healthy eating and activity and healthy weight in middle school adolescents by gender and ethnicity. Background: Obesity in youth has become a national epidemic and is worsening despite efforts to address the serious health and social consequences. Research suggests that social support by parents and peers may help adolescents in making healthy eating and activity choices, but gender and ethnic differences have been reported in the literature. Methods: A secondary data analysis of baseline data from an intervention study was used to determine relationships between social support and BMI percentile for race and gender. Social support was measured by the abbreviated Social Support and Eating Habits Survey and Social Support and Exercise Survey. Demographic characteristics of the sample were analyzed using Chi-square and t-test. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationship between BMI percentile and social support variables. A convenient sample of 258 middle school students in an urban mid-South community participated in the study. Abbreviated versions of the Social Support family eating (Alpha = .776), Social Support family exercise (Alpha = .909), Social Support friend eating (Alpha = .777), and Social Support friend exercise (Alpha = .876) Scale were used to measure social support from peers and family. Results: The results showed significant differences in social support variables for females compared to social support in males in this population. In males, BMI percentile was significantly correlated with family social support for exercise (r =.177; p &lt; .05) and social support from friends for healthy eating (r =.178, p &lt;.05), demonstrating that more obese males are likely to get support from both family and friends for healthy eating and exercise. In females, social support from family for healthy eating significantly correlated with BMI percentile (r = .412, p &lt; .01), demonstrating that more obese females are more likely to get social support from family for healthy eating. In nonwhite teens, BMI percentile significantly correlated with social support from family for healthy eating (r = .158, p &lt;.05). In white teens, BMI percentile significantly correlated with family support for healthy eating (r = .401, p &lt; .01), family support for exercise (r = .354, p &lt; .05) and friend support for healthy eating (r = .340, p &lt; .05). Implications: These findings demonstrate that social support in females is different from that of males, suggesting effective obesity intervention programs targeting social support should be gender specific. In addition, the findings suggest differences in social support for ethnic groups that should be considered when developing obesity programs for specific populations. Social support to address&nbsp;culture and ethnic lifestyles that contribute to greater rates of obesity must have priority in obesity prevention research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:03:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:03:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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