2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157645
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Workplace Stress Among Nurse Managers
Abstract:
Understanding Workplace Stress Among Nurse Managers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Stichler, Jaynelle F., DNSc, RN, FACHE, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:San Diego State University, Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:5500 Campanile Drive, Mail Code 4158, San Diego, CA, 92182-4158, USA
Contact Telephone:858-451-8557
Co-Authors:Mark Ehrhart, PhD, Associate Professor Organizational Psychology; Lisa Kath, PhD, Associate Professor Organizational Psychology
Introduction and Background: Nurse managers are the direct interface between upper management and the point of care nurse providers. The literature is replete with evidence about the importance of nurse managers in establishing a positive work environment, increasing or maintaining job satisfaction, and helping retain nurses. Unfortunately, many nurse managers feel the compression of competing priorities, such as organizational performance and budgetary targets, staff needs, physician demands and regulatory and compliance requirements. We expect this role to become more demanding, with nurse managers experiencing significant and increasing workplace stress, which may hamper the ability of the nurse managers to be successful in their roles. Purpose: This study adopts an interdisciplinary approach to measuring the sources and outcomes of workplace stress experienced by nurse managers working in acute care healthcare settings. The relationships between stressors and outcomes, and the hospital characteristics (e.g., Magnet status, unionization, academic settings, specialty hospitals, hospital size, rural or urban setting) that buffer managers from stress-related outcomes will be reported. Significance: This study is significant because of the influence that nurse managers have on their clinical nurses. It is also increasingly difficult to recruit and retain nurse managers because of the role stress they experience. Aspiring nurse leaders have many other options to further their careers without assuming the stress of the management position. Identifying the stressors and outcomes experienced by nurse managers will offer insight into potential interventions that can be developed to facilitate their success in the leadership role. Conceptual Framework: This study is based on the General Stress Model and Role Stress Theory from organizational psychology. A conceptual model illustrates the relationships among the variables of: 1) workplace stressors, such as role conflict, role overload, role ambiguity, interpersonal conflict, and organization constraints; 2) outcomes, such as burnout, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover; and 3) hospital characteristics as moderators of stress, such as Magnet designation, unionization status, and affiliation/type/size. Methods: The study uses a cross-sectional, correlational design with a non-probability convenience sample drawn from a population of nurse managers working in 34 hospitals in the southwest region of the US. The sample size is expected to be approximately 400 subjects and includes nurse managers with 24/7 or 12/7 direct supervision of clinical nurses. Study variables (stressors, moderators, and outcomes) are measured using previously published scales with demonstrated psychometric properties. IRB approvals have been obtained from SDSU and each study site. Results: Data collection is approximately 60% complete as of October 2008 and will be completed by December 2008. Data will be analyzed and results ready for presentation by March 2009. Funding: This research was supported in part by the 2008 Sayre Memorial Fund from ANF.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Workplace Stress Among Nurse Managersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157645-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding Workplace Stress Among Nurse Managers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stichler, Jaynelle F., DNSc, RN, FACHE, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Diego State University, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5500 Campanile Drive, Mail Code 4158, San Diego, CA, 92182-4158, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">858-451-8557</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stichler@mail.sdsu.edu, jstichler@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mark Ehrhart, PhD, Associate Professor Organizational Psychology; Lisa Kath, PhD, Associate Professor Organizational Psychology</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction and Background: Nurse managers are the direct interface between upper management and the point of care nurse providers. The literature is replete with evidence about the importance of nurse managers in establishing a positive work environment, increasing or maintaining job satisfaction, and helping retain nurses. Unfortunately, many nurse managers feel the compression of competing priorities, such as organizational performance and budgetary targets, staff needs, physician demands and regulatory and compliance requirements. We expect this role to become more demanding, with nurse managers experiencing significant and increasing workplace stress, which may hamper the ability of the nurse managers to be successful in their roles. Purpose: This study adopts an interdisciplinary approach to measuring the sources and outcomes of workplace stress experienced by nurse managers working in acute care healthcare settings. The relationships between stressors and outcomes, and the hospital characteristics (e.g., Magnet status, unionization, academic settings, specialty hospitals, hospital size, rural or urban setting) that buffer managers from stress-related outcomes will be reported. Significance: This study is significant because of the influence that nurse managers have on their clinical nurses. It is also increasingly difficult to recruit and retain nurse managers because of the role stress they experience. Aspiring nurse leaders have many other options to further their careers without assuming the stress of the management position. Identifying the stressors and outcomes experienced by nurse managers will offer insight into potential interventions that can be developed to facilitate their success in the leadership role. Conceptual Framework: This study is based on the General Stress Model and Role Stress Theory from organizational psychology. A conceptual model illustrates the relationships among the variables of: 1) workplace stressors, such as role conflict, role overload, role ambiguity, interpersonal conflict, and organization constraints; 2) outcomes, such as burnout, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover; and 3) hospital characteristics as moderators of stress, such as Magnet designation, unionization status, and affiliation/type/size. Methods: The study uses a cross-sectional, correlational design with a non-probability convenience sample drawn from a population of nurse managers working in 34 hospitals in the southwest region of the US. The sample size is expected to be approximately 400 subjects and includes nurse managers with 24/7 or 12/7 direct supervision of clinical nurses. Study variables (stressors, moderators, and outcomes) are measured using previously published scales with demonstrated psychometric properties. IRB approvals have been obtained from SDSU and each study site. Results: Data collection is approximately 60% complete as of October 2008 and will be completed by December 2008. Data will be analyzed and results ready for presentation by March 2009. Funding: This research was supported in part by the 2008 Sayre Memorial Fund from ANF.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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