2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157646
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Directors' Perceptions of Nurse Mentoring
Abstract:
Nursing Directors' Perceptions of Nurse Mentoring
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Stoeckel, Pamella R., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Regis University, Loretto Heights School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:3333 Regis Boulevard, G-8, Denver, CO, 80221-1099, USA
Contact Telephone:303-458-4975
Purposed/Aims: This paper reports the finding of a study that examined nursing directors' perceptions of nurse mentoring in their facilities. The literature reveals distinct differences in definitions of mentoring and how it is utilized.  The study questions focused on nursing directors' perceptions of the concept of mentoring, and how and why it was implemented. Nursing directors' past experiences with mentoring were analyzed. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: With the current nursing shortage, mentoring is viewed as an approach to recruitment, retention and empowerment of nursing staff (Valencia-Go, 2005).  Bally (2007) noted that "Formal nursing management must understand the connections between mentoring and organizational culture; and emphasize the importance of mentoring in their work environments" (p. 145). The conceptual framework for the study utilized Bandura's Social Learning Theory, Benner's Novice to Expert and Schön's Reflective Practice Theory. Methods: The research design was a qualitative study that utilized the key informant approach as a means of gathering nursing directors' perceptions of nurse mentoring. Eight hospital nursing directors from a Western metropolitan city were interviewed in-depth using open ended questions to ascertain how they defined nurse mentoring, and how mentoring was operationalzed in their facilities. Interviews were transcribed, analyzed, and coded for themes using a content analysis approach. Trustworthiness of the study was maintained through an audit trail, reflective notes, member checking and peer review. Results: Results of the study showed that nursing directors differ in their definitions of mentoring and how they operationalize mentoring in their facilities. Formal and informal mentoring relationships were found and were viewed differently. There was inconsistency in the use of the terms used to describe a mentor. They expressed positive attitudes about nurse mentoring, but expressed vague and ambivalent approaches to operationalizing mentoring. Past experiences with mentoring influenced directors' perceptions. Mentoring was not fully utilized as a method of recruitment and retention or as a support for associate degree nurses returning for a baccalaureate degree. Implications: This study suggests that clarity in defining mentoring is needed in order to facilitate future research and effectively implement nurse mentoring programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Directors' Perceptions of Nurse Mentoringen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157646-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Directors' Perceptions of Nurse Mentoring</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stoeckel, Pamella R., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regis University, Loretto Heights School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Regis Boulevard, G-8, Denver, CO, 80221-1099, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-458-4975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pstoecke@regis.edu, pamella_stoeckel@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposed/Aims: This paper reports the finding of a study that examined nursing directors' perceptions of nurse mentoring in their facilities. The literature reveals distinct differences in definitions of mentoring and how it is utilized.&nbsp; The study questions focused on nursing directors' perceptions of the concept of mentoring, and how and why it was implemented. Nursing directors' past experiences with mentoring were analyzed. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: With the current nursing shortage, mentoring is viewed as an approach to recruitment, retention and empowerment of nursing staff (Valencia-Go, 2005).&nbsp; Bally (2007) noted that &quot;Formal nursing management must understand the connections between mentoring and organizational culture; and emphasize the importance of mentoring in their work environments&quot; (p. 145). The conceptual framework for the study utilized Bandura's Social Learning Theory, Benner's Novice to Expert and Sch&ouml;n's Reflective Practice Theory. Methods: The research design was a qualitative study that utilized the key informant approach as a means of gathering nursing directors' perceptions of nurse mentoring. Eight hospital nursing directors from a Western metropolitan city were interviewed in-depth using open ended questions to ascertain how they defined nurse mentoring, and how mentoring was operationalzed in their facilities. Interviews were transcribed, analyzed, and coded for themes using a content analysis approach. Trustworthiness of the study was maintained through an audit trail, reflective notes, member checking and peer review. Results: Results of the study showed that nursing directors differ in their definitions of mentoring and how they operationalize mentoring in their facilities. Formal and informal mentoring relationships were found and were viewed differently. There was inconsistency in the use of the terms used to describe a mentor. They expressed positive attitudes about nurse mentoring, but expressed vague and ambivalent approaches to operationalizing mentoring. Past experiences with mentoring influenced directors' perceptions. Mentoring was not fully utilized as a method of recruitment and retention or as a support for associate degree nurses returning for a baccalaureate degree. Implications: This study suggests that clarity in defining mentoring is needed in order to facilitate future research and effectively implement nurse mentoring programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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