2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157649
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Men's Depression and Grief at One Year After Miscarriage
Abstract:
Predictors of Men's Depression and Grief at One Year After Miscarriage
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Swanson, Kristen, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Department of Family & Child Nursing
Title:UWMC Term Professor in Nursing Leadership & Chair
Contact Address:Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98185, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-8775
Co-Authors:Danuta Wojnar, PhD, RN, MEd, IBCLC, Assistant Professor
Aims:   The purpose of this theory-testing exploratory investigation was to describe the predictors of men's depression and grief at one year after miscarriage. Rationale: Qualitative studies provide evidence that miscarriage takes its toll on men. Men have been described as experiencing a deepened awareness of the fragility of life, the loss of their family's hopes and dreams, and a strong sense of vulnerability and powerlessness to help their mates.1 Immediately after miscarriage while men have lower active grief scores than their spouse, they have somewhat higher difficulty coping and despair scores.2  This pattern has been found to predict higher grief scores at two years after loss.3 Little is understood about the ways in which the context of miscarriage impacts men's appraisal, coping, and emotions after miscarriage. Methods: The theoretical framework for this secondary analysis of data from the Couples' Miscarriage Healing Project (CMHP) was the Lazarus Stress and Adaptation Model.  Factor analysis and a five stage path analysis were employed. All data were gathered via mailed surveys. Stage I factored variables (loss context), were gathered 1 month after loss and included: stability (financial and personal maturity), mental health, time to conceive, pregnancy length, father involvement in the miscarriage event, treatment (from CMHP), prior loss, relationship quality, and obstetrical provider caring. Stage II (context at one year) included: emotional strength, satisfaction with support of others, mate communication, concurrent stressors; and pregnant again.  Stage III (appraisal) focused on the Personal Significance of Miscarriage. Stage IV (reappraisal) included active and passive coping. Stage V (emotional responses) included depression (CESD) and pure grief.  All measures demonstrated adequate internal consistency. Results: The Adjusted R2 for depression was .546. The strongest predictors of depression were emotional strength (Beta = -.55); mate communication (Beta = -.18); passive coping (Beta = .18); concurrent stressors (Beta = .14); and pregnant again (Beta = -.09). Variables which indirectly impacted depression included stability, mental health history, relationship quality, time to conceive, and father's involvement in the miscarriage event. The Adjusted R2  for pure grief was .541.  The strongest predictors of grief were personal significance of miscarriage (Beta = .62) and passive coping (Beta = .14). Variables which indirectly impacted grief included mental health history, pregnancy length, and emotional strength. Implications: Men's appraisal of miscarriage as meaningful predicted higher grief at one year.  Depression at one year was more closely aligned with low emotional strength, poorer communication with their mate, a tendency to cope passively, stressful life circumstances, and failing to conceive again. Perhaps men's depression after miscarriage reflects a failure to directly deal with the loss. Alternatively, depression at one year may be due to life circumstances beyond the miscarriage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Men's Depression and Grief at One Year After Miscarriageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157649-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Men's Depression and Grief at One Year After Miscarriage</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Swanson, Kristen, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Department of Family &amp; Child Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">UWMC Term Professor in Nursing Leadership &amp; Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98185, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-8775</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kswanson@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Danuta Wojnar, PhD, RN, MEd, IBCLC, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aims: &nbsp;&nbsp;The purpose of this theory-testing exploratory investigation was to describe the predictors of men's depression and grief at one year after miscarriage. Rationale: Qualitative studies provide evidence that miscarriage takes its toll on men. Men have been described as experiencing a deepened awareness of the fragility of life, the loss of their family's hopes and dreams, and a strong sense of vulnerability and powerlessness to help their mates.1 Immediately after miscarriage while men have lower active grief scores than their spouse, they have somewhat higher difficulty coping and despair scores.2 &nbsp;This pattern has been found to predict higher grief scores at two years after loss.3 Little is understood about the ways in which the context of miscarriage impacts men's appraisal, coping, and emotions after miscarriage. Methods: The theoretical framework for this secondary analysis of data from the Couples' Miscarriage Healing Project (CMHP) was the Lazarus Stress and Adaptation Model. &nbsp;Factor analysis and a five stage path analysis were employed. All data were gathered via mailed surveys. Stage I factored variables (loss context), were gathered 1 month after loss and included: stability (financial and personal maturity), mental health, time to conceive, pregnancy length, father involvement in the miscarriage event, treatment (from CMHP), prior loss, relationship quality, and obstetrical provider caring. Stage II (context at one year) included: emotional strength, satisfaction with support of others, mate communication, concurrent stressors; and pregnant again.&nbsp; Stage III (appraisal) focused on the Personal Significance of Miscarriage. Stage IV (reappraisal) included active and passive coping. Stage V (emotional responses) included depression (CESD) and pure grief.&nbsp; All measures demonstrated adequate internal consistency. Results: The Adjusted R2 for depression was .546. The strongest predictors of depression were emotional strength (Beta = -.55); mate communication (Beta = -.18); passive coping (Beta = .18); concurrent stressors (Beta = .14); and pregnant again (Beta = -.09). Variables which indirectly impacted depression included stability, mental health history, relationship quality, time to conceive, and father's involvement in the miscarriage event. The Adjusted R2 &nbsp;for pure grief was .541.&nbsp; The strongest predictors of grief were personal significance of miscarriage (Beta = .62) and passive coping (Beta = .14). Variables which indirectly impacted grief included mental health history, pregnancy length, and emotional strength. Implications: Men's appraisal of miscarriage as meaningful predicted higher grief at one year.&nbsp; Depression at one year was more closely aligned with low emotional strength, poorer communication with their mate, a tendency to cope passively, stressful life circumstances, and failing to conceive again. Perhaps men's depression after miscarriage reflects a failure to directly deal with the loss. Alternatively, depression at one year may be due to life circumstances beyond the miscarriage.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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