2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157651
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concurrent Validity of the Actiwatch-64 and Polysomnography in Older Women
Abstract:
Concurrent Validity of the Actiwatch-64 and Polysomnography in Older Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Taibi, Diana M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA
Contact Telephone:206-685-8939
Co-Authors:Carol Landis, DNSc, RN, FAAN, Professor; Teresa Ward, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Purposes/Aims:  The aim of this study is to examine the concurrent validity of sleep assessments from Actiwatch-64 (AW-64, Mini-mitter, Bend, OR) with polysomnography (PSG), the current gold standard of sleep measurement. The study is a secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial of valerian in older women with insomnia. Background/Rationale: Actigraphs, small wrist-worn devices, measure activity as a proxy for sleep and wake behavior based on the premise that sleep is accompanied by minimal physical activity.  Because actigraphy measures body movements rather than directly measuring brainwave sleep patterns, the validity of actigraphy may vary in different populations and under different conditions.  The accuracy of actigraphy in distinguishing sleep from wake behavior decreases under conditions in which participants lie motionless and awake, as often occurs in insomnia.  Additionally, measures of validity differ between specific actigraph devices that vary in their physical properties and use different mathematical algorithms in the associated software to calculate measures of sleep and wake.  The few studies that examined AW-64 validity have shown inconsistent findings, with correlations on sleep outcomes from AW-64 and PSG ranging from weak (.30) to strong (.83).  Only one study reported minute-to-minute agreement of actigraphy with PSG, finding high sensitivity (92%).  Findings from the current study will add much-needed data on the validity of the AW-64 for assessing sleep specifically in older women with insomnia. Methods:  Concurrent actigraphy and PSG recordings were obtained during nine nights of an efficacy study of the herb valerian.  Participants were 16 older women (mean age 69.4 ± 8.1 years) with insomnia.  Sleep parameters (sleep latency, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset) were scored using Actiware 3.4 and statistical analyses were done using SPSS 15.0.  Epoch-by-epoch agreement was represented by the percentage of PSG sleep (sensitivity) and wake (specificity) correctly detected by AW-64 as well as overall agreement for all epochs.  Predictive values for AW-64 sleep and wake (the probability that AW-64-identified sleep and wake were correct by PSG criteria) were also calculated. Validity of the calculated sleep parameters was analyzed using Pearson's correlations and Bland-Altman graphs.  Bland-Altman analyses allow exploration of whether the difference between two measures varies over the scale of measurement; i.e., whether or not discrepancies are greater as sleep becomes more disturbed.  Results:  Analyses are currently in progress. Implications:  Findings from this study will provide data on the validity of the AW-64 sleep assessments that will guide the use of actigraphy for sleep assessment in future studies of insomnia in older women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcurrent Validity of the Actiwatch-64 and Polysomnography in Older Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157651-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Concurrent Validity of the Actiwatch-64 and Polysomnography in Older Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taibi, Diana M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-685-8939</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmtaibi@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Landis, DNSc, RN, FAAN, Professor; Teresa Ward, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims:&nbsp; The aim of this study is to examine the concurrent validity of sleep assessments from Actiwatch-64 (AW-64, Mini-mitter, Bend, OR) with polysomnography (PSG), the current gold standard of sleep measurement. The study is a secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial of valerian in older women with insomnia. Background/Rationale: Actigraphs, small wrist-worn devices, measure activity as a proxy for sleep and wake behavior based on the premise that sleep is accompanied by minimal physical activity.&nbsp; Because actigraphy measures body movements rather than directly measuring brainwave sleep patterns, the validity of actigraphy may vary in different populations and under different conditions.&nbsp; The accuracy of actigraphy in distinguishing sleep from wake behavior decreases under conditions in which participants lie motionless and awake, as often occurs in insomnia.&nbsp; Additionally, measures of validity differ between specific actigraph devices that vary in their physical properties and use different mathematical algorithms in the associated software to calculate measures of sleep and wake.&nbsp; The few studies that examined AW-64 validity have shown inconsistent findings, with correlations on sleep outcomes from AW-64 and PSG ranging from weak (.30) to strong (.83).&nbsp; Only one study reported minute-to-minute agreement of actigraphy with PSG, finding high sensitivity (92%).&nbsp; Findings from the current study will add much-needed data on the validity of the AW-64 for assessing sleep specifically in older women with insomnia. Methods:&nbsp; Concurrent actigraphy and PSG recordings were obtained during nine nights of an efficacy study of the herb valerian.&nbsp; Participants were 16 older women (mean age 69.4 &plusmn; 8.1 years) with insomnia.&nbsp; Sleep parameters (sleep latency, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake after sleep onset) were scored using Actiware 3.4 and statistical analyses were done using SPSS 15.0.&nbsp; Epoch-by-epoch agreement was represented by the percentage of PSG sleep (sensitivity) and wake (specificity) correctly detected by AW-64 as well as overall agreement for all epochs.&nbsp; Predictive values for AW-64 sleep and wake (the probability that AW-64-identified sleep and wake were correct by PSG criteria) were also calculated. Validity of the calculated sleep parameters was analyzed using Pearson's correlations and Bland-Altman graphs.&nbsp; Bland-Altman analyses allow exploration of whether the difference between two measures varies over the scale of measurement; i.e., whether or not discrepancies are greater as sleep becomes more disturbed.&nbsp; Results:&nbsp; Analyses are currently in progress. Implications:&nbsp; Findings from this study will provide data on the validity of the AW-64 sleep assessments that will guide the use of actigraphy for sleep assessment in future studies of insomnia in older women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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