2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Partners of Prostate Cancer Patients: What Do They Say About Their Experience?
Abstract:
Partners of Prostate Cancer Patients: What Do They Say About Their Experience?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tanner, Tanya, RN, CNM, MS, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:in care of Michael Galbraith, Mail Stop c288--18, 13120 E. 19th Ave., Rm. 4314, PO Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:303-918-9828
Co-Authors:Michael Galbraith, RN, PhD, Associate Professor; Laura Hays, RN, MS, Doctoral Student
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to qualitatively analyze the content of responses to open-ended questions collected over a 6-year time period from the partners of men receiving treatment for early-stage prostate cancer. This work was part of two larger studies aimed at describing the health-related quality of life, satisfaction with partnered-relationships, and treatment-related symptoms for men who had been treated for early-stage prostate cancer. Rationale: The rationale for these studies was to better understand the experience of partners of prostate cancer patients and to give voice to their unique experience. The theoretical basis for these studies was constructed from Padilla's conceptualization of Health-Related Quality of Life for patients with cancer which includes patients' and family members' complex evaluative responses to psychological, physical, social, spiritual, and somatic functioning. It was also informed by Minuchin's Family Systems Theory. Methods: Approximately 344 partners were enrolled in the two studies and were given questionnaires to fill out every 6 months for 18 months and then annually thereafter (see Galbraith et al., 2005 & 2008 for a full description of the study methods). Data were collected from both studies from 2001 through 2006, and at the end of data collection a total of 115 partner participants remained. Approximately one-third of these had provided qualitative responses to the invitation to make additional open-ended comments about their experience beyond issues addressed by the closed-ended survey questions. Data analysis is being conducted in a three-step process: First, inductive codes were created after reviewing each line of the aggregated comments, Second, the codes will be grouped into related categories, and Third, themes will be identified from these categories. Results: Step 1 of the analyses has been completed. Codes have been developed that range from identifying descriptions of the effect of the experience on the couple's marital and sexual relationships and the effects of other health concerns on their experience, to the role that spirituality plays in coping with adversity. Steps 2 and 3 of the analysis will be completed by January, 2009. Implications:  Partners of prostate cancer patients have distinctive perceptions, concerns, and understanding regarding their unique experiences that must be taken into consideration when planning for follow-up encounters and for addressing educational needs related to the couple's transition into cancer survivorship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePartners of Prostate Cancer Patients: What Do They Say About Their Experience?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Partners of Prostate Cancer Patients: What Do They Say About Their Experience?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tanner, Tanya, RN, CNM, MS, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">in care of Michael Galbraith, Mail Stop c288--18, 13120 E. 19th Ave., Rm. 4314, PO Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-918-9828</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tanya.tanner@uchsc.edu, tanyacnm@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Galbraith, RN, PhD, Associate Professor; Laura Hays, RN, MS, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to qualitatively analyze the content of responses to open-ended questions collected over a 6-year time period from the partners of men receiving treatment for early-stage prostate cancer. This work was part of two larger studies aimed at describing the health-related quality of life, satisfaction with partnered-relationships, and treatment-related symptoms for men who had been treated for early-stage prostate cancer. Rationale: The rationale for these studies was to better understand the experience of partners of prostate cancer patients and to give voice to their unique experience. The theoretical basis for these studies was constructed from Padilla's conceptualization of Health-Related Quality of Life for patients with cancer which includes patients' and family members' complex evaluative responses to psychological, physical, social, spiritual, and somatic functioning. It was also informed by Minuchin's Family Systems Theory. Methods: Approximately 344 partners were enrolled in the two studies and were given questionnaires to fill out every 6 months for 18 months and then annually thereafter (see Galbraith et al., 2005 &amp; 2008 for a full description of the study methods). Data were collected from both studies from 2001 through 2006, and at the end of data collection a total of 115 partner participants remained. Approximately one-third of these had provided qualitative responses to the invitation to make additional open-ended comments about their experience beyond issues addressed by the closed-ended survey questions. Data analysis is being conducted in a three-step process: First, inductive codes were created after reviewing each line of the aggregated comments, Second, the codes will be grouped into related categories, and Third, themes will be identified from these categories. Results: Step 1 of the analyses has been completed. Codes have been developed that range from identifying descriptions of the effect of the experience on the couple's marital and sexual relationships and the effects of other health concerns on their experience, to the role that spirituality plays in coping with adversity. Steps 2 and 3 of the analysis will be completed by January, 2009. Implications: &nbsp;Partners of prostate cancer patients have distinctive perceptions, concerns, and understanding regarding their unique experiences that must be taken into consideration when planning for follow-up encounters and for addressing educational needs related to the couple's transition into cancer survivorship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.