2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157654
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mother's Thoughts About the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine
Abstract:
Mother's Thoughts About the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tanner, Tanya, RN, CNM, MS, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:in care of Michael Galbraith, Mail Stop c288--18, 13120 E 19th Ave., Rm. 4314, PO Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA
Contact Telephone:303-918-9828
Co-Authors:Laura Hays, RN, MS, Doctoral Student; Michelle Kahn-John, MS, APRN, PMHNP-BC, Doctoral Student; Rhonda Knapp-Clevenger, PNP, BC, Doctoral Student; Pamela Lake, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Priscilla Nodine, RN, CNM, Doctoral Student
Purpose: A qualitative descriptive design was used to describe factors that influence maternal decisions of whether or not to vaccinate their daughters for human papillomavirus (HPV). Specific aims were to: (1) explore maternal knowledge and attitudes concerning vaccination of their daughters against HPV, (2) identify and describe influences and resources impacting maternal decision making concerning vaccination of their daughters against HPV, and (3) develop recommendations for HPV vaccination education for healthcare professionals and the lay community. Background: HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States and the most common cause of cervical cancer in women. In June 2006, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was approved in the US for use in females aged 9-26 years. The vaccine's efficacy is most effective if given before the age of fourteen. With HPV infection in adolescent girls at a striking 82%, investigation into maternal decision making regarding vaccination of their teen and pre-teen aged daughters is timely. Methods: Eighteen mothers with daughters aged 9 to17 years participated in face to face audio tape recorded interviews. Semi structured and open ended questions focused on factors influencing maternal knowledge and decision making regarding vaccination of their pre-teen and teenage daughters against HPV. Data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive coding by individual researchers and in collaboration with team members to identify categories and themes. Results: Findings suggest that the decision to vaccinate one's daughter for HPV is complex and multi-factorial. Major categories included sexuality, general beliefs about vaccination and the overall healthcare system, and maternal assessment of the daughter's readiness to receive the vaccine. Mothers were the primary decision makers with regard to the HPV vaccination of their daughters and received information regarding vaccination primarily from the media, healthcare providers and family/social contacts. Implications:  Healthcare providers may play a major role in maternal decision making regarding vaccination for HPV. Individual nursing assessment of maternal values and beliefs as well as discussion regarding the availability of the vaccine should be initiated at all teen and pre-teen healthcare contacts. Patient- tailored educational materials about the vaccine and potential side effects should be readily available and information regarding the HPV virus and the most effective time for vaccination must be provided.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMother's Thoughts About the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccineen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157654-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mother's Thoughts About the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tanner, Tanya, RN, CNM, MS, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">in care of Michael Galbraith, Mail Stop c288--18, 13120 E 19th Ave., Rm. 4314, PO Box 6511, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-918-9828</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tanya.tanner@uchsc.edu, tanyacnm@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laura Hays, RN, MS, Doctoral Student; Michelle Kahn-John, MS, APRN, PMHNP-BC, Doctoral Student; Rhonda Knapp-Clevenger, PNP, BC, Doctoral Student; Pamela Lake, MSN, RN, Doctoral Student; Priscilla Nodine, RN, CNM, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: A qualitative descriptive design was used to describe factors that influence maternal decisions of whether or not to vaccinate their daughters for human papillomavirus (HPV). Specific aims were to: (1) explore maternal knowledge and attitudes concerning vaccination of their daughters against HPV, (2) identify and describe influences and resources impacting maternal decision making concerning vaccination of their daughters against HPV, and (3) develop recommendations for HPV vaccination education for healthcare professionals and the lay community. Background: HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States and the most common cause of cervical cancer in women. In June 2006, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was approved in the US for use in females aged 9-26 years. The vaccine's efficacy is most effective if given before the age of fourteen. With HPV infection in adolescent girls at a striking 82%, investigation into maternal decision making regarding vaccination of their teen and pre-teen aged daughters is timely. Methods: Eighteen mothers with daughters aged 9 to17 years participated in face to face audio tape recorded interviews. Semi structured and open ended questions focused on factors influencing maternal knowledge and decision making regarding vaccination of their pre-teen and teenage daughters against HPV. Data were analyzed using qualitative descriptive coding by individual researchers and in collaboration with team members to identify categories and themes. Results: Findings suggest that the decision to vaccinate one's daughter for HPV is complex and multi-factorial. Major categories included sexuality, general beliefs about vaccination and the overall healthcare system, and maternal assessment of the daughter's readiness to receive the vaccine. Mothers were the primary decision makers with regard to the HPV vaccination of their daughters and received information regarding vaccination primarily from the media, healthcare providers and family/social contacts. Implications: &nbsp;Healthcare providers may play a major role in maternal decision making regarding vaccination for HPV. Individual nursing assessment of maternal values and beliefs as well as discussion regarding the availability of the vaccine should be initiated at all teen and pre-teen healthcare contacts. Patient- tailored educational materials about the vaccine and potential side effects should be readily available and information regarding the HPV virus and the most effective time for vaccination must be provided.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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