2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157655
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Proposed Theoretical Model of Decision Making in Adults With Cancer
Abstract:
A Proposed Theoretical Model of Decision Making in Adults With Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tariman, Joseph D., PhC, RN, MN, ARNP, BC, OCN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems
Title:Pre-doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:917 N 72nd Street, Seattle, WA, 98103, USA
Contact Telephone:206-437-2328
Purpose/Aim: To develop a theoretical model of decision making participation, decisional regret, decisional conflict, satisfaction with decision, and quality of life (QOL) in adults with cancer. Rationale/Background: The treatment decision making process in adults with cancer is not clearly understood. This is due in part to the limited studies which systematically examine the mediating and moderating factors that influence the decision making process. Methods and Analysis: Computer-based searches using Pubmed, PsycInfo, and CINAHL databases were conducted. Critical appraisal of 41 studies on decision making preferences of adults with various cancers (prostate, breast, colorectal, ovarian, lung) was performed. Correlational data among socio-demographics, level of participation, decisional conflict, decisional regret, satisfaction with decision, and QOL variables were obtained and systematically analyzed. Outcomes Achieved/Documented: The majority of decision making studies have examined the relationship between socio-demographic factors and patients' level of participation (passive, collaborative, active), both preferred and actual roles performed during decision making. Decision satisfaction and QOL were two main outcomes of decision making research commonly recognized by many clinicians. Based on these findings, a theoretical model of decision making, decisional conflict, decisional regret, satisfaction with decision, and QOL was developed as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Proposed Theoretical Model of Decision Making Participation, Decisional Conflict, Regret, Satisfaction, and QOL in Adults with Cancer. Conclusions/Recommendations: Decisional regret and decisional conflict are important negative outcomes of decision making that can be potentially negated by decision support interventions. Theoretical testing of the model presented in this paper is warranted to help identify the mechanisms that can improve outcomes of decision making.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Proposed Theoretical Model of Decision Making in Adults With Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157655-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Proposed Theoretical Model of Decision Making in Adults With Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tariman, Joseph D., PhC, RN, MN, ARNP, BC, OCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">917 N 72nd Street, Seattle, WA, 98103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-437-2328</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jtariman@u.washington.edu, phdinseattle@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: To develop a theoretical model of decision making participation, decisional regret, decisional conflict, satisfaction with decision, and quality of life (QOL) in adults with cancer. Rationale/Background: The treatment decision making process in adults with cancer is not clearly understood. This is due in part to the limited studies which systematically examine the mediating and moderating factors that influence the decision making process. Methods and Analysis: Computer-based searches using Pubmed, PsycInfo, and CINAHL databases were conducted. Critical appraisal of 41 studies on decision making preferences of adults with various cancers (prostate, breast, colorectal, ovarian, lung) was performed. Correlational data among socio-demographics, level of participation, decisional conflict, decisional regret, satisfaction with decision, and QOL variables were obtained and systematically analyzed.&nbsp;Outcomes Achieved/Documented: The majority of decision making studies have examined the relationship between socio-demographic factors and patients' level of participation (passive, collaborative, active), both preferred and actual roles performed during decision making. Decision satisfaction and QOL were two main outcomes of decision making research commonly recognized by many clinicians. Based on these findings, a theoretical model of decision making, decisional conflict, decisional regret, satisfaction with decision, and QOL was developed as shown in figure 1.&nbsp;Figure 1. Proposed Theoretical Model of Decision Making Participation, Decisional Conflict, Regret, Satisfaction, and QOL in Adults with Cancer. Conclusions/Recommendations: Decisional regret and decisional conflict are important negative outcomes of decision making that can be potentially negated by decision support interventions. Theoretical testing of the model presented in this paper is warranted to help identify the mechanisms that can improve outcomes of decision making.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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