2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157657
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Job Satisfaction in the Nurse Executive
Abstract:
Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Job Satisfaction in the Nurse Executive
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tarrant, Theresa Ann, PhD, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nursing
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:6967 Casa Encantada, Las Vegas, NV, 89118, USA
Contact Telephone:702-639-7733
Purposes/ Aims: The purpose was to determine if Nurse Executives (NEs) perceive role conflict, role ambiguity and if they are satisfied with their current position. Background: Healthcare organizations have seen remarkable and unprecedented changes and as a result, the role of the NE has expanded significantly.  According to a 2003 study, the average age of a NE is 49 years (Ballein Search Partners, 2003) with many expected to retire over the next 12 years. The potential exists for a leadership vacuum. Despite drastic changes in healthcare and nursing practice, changes in nursing education have not kept pace. Methods: A cross sectional survey of 1000 members of AONE was conducted with the Job Conflict and Ambiguity Scale developed by House, Schuler, and Levanoni , the Job Satisfaction Index developed by Schriesheim and Tsui, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale as developed by Lenore Radloff. Participants had the option of participating electronically or via paper surveys. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, MANOVA and t test comparisons with a previous survey. Results: The data revealed low to moderate levels of role conflict (3.04), and role ambiguity (2.91), high levels of job satisfaction (4.01), and low levels of depression (7.42) among those surveyed. No relationship was identified between NE age and any of the four dependent variables; with some degree of relationship with educational level. Implications: This study provided a baseline of the status and condition of the NE. Further research should include leadership skills, strengths, weaknesses, and coping strategies of the nurse executive.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRole Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Job Satisfaction in the Nurse Executiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157657-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Job Satisfaction in the Nurse Executive</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tarrant, Theresa Ann, PhD, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6967 Casa Encantada, Las Vegas, NV, 89118, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-639-7733</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">timteriemily@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/ Aims: The purpose was to determine if Nurse Executives (NEs) perceive role conflict, role ambiguity and if they are satisfied with their current position. Background: Healthcare organizations have seen remarkable and unprecedented changes and as a result, the role of the NE has expanded significantly. &nbsp;According to a 2003 study, the average age of a NE is 49 years (Ballein Search Partners, 2003) with many expected to retire over the next 12 years. The potential exists for a leadership vacuum. Despite drastic changes in healthcare and nursing practice, changes in nursing education have not kept pace. Methods: A cross sectional survey of 1000 members of AONE was conducted with the Job Conflict and Ambiguity Scale developed by House, Schuler, and Levanoni , the Job Satisfaction Index developed by Schriesheim and Tsui, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale as developed by Lenore Radloff. Participants had the option of participating electronically or via paper surveys. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, MANOVA and t test comparisons with a previous survey. Results: The data revealed low to moderate levels of role conflict (3.04), and role ambiguity (2.91), high levels of job satisfaction (4.01), and low levels of depression (7.42) among those surveyed. No relationship was identified between NE age and any of the four dependent variables; with some degree of relationship with educational level. Implications: This study provided a baseline of the status and condition of the NE. Further research should include leadership skills, strengths, weaknesses, and coping strategies of the nurse executive.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.