2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157658
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transition Barriers of Foreign-Educated Nurses: Stakeholders' Perspectives
Abstract:
Transition Barriers of Foreign-Educated Nurses: Stakeholders' Perspectives
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Thekdi, Prachi, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Chandler Regional Medical Center, Telemetry Department
Title:Staff Nurse
Contact Address:475 S. Dobson Road, Chandler, AZ, 85224, USA
Contact Telephone:480-522-4754
Co-Authors:Barbara Wilson, PhD, RNC, Associate Professor; Yu Xu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE, Associate Professor/PhD Coordinator
Purpose: This study examined the experiences of foreign-educated nurses (FENs) working in a US health care system to identify core barriers encountered during their transition. In addition, it sought perspectives of multiple stakeholders to understand and validate these barriers. Background: An increasing number of FENs arrive in the United States every year to supplement its growing nursing shortage. Successful adaptation of FENs is an important issue that affects patient safety and quality of care. To ensure adaptation of FENs, it is important to develop an understanding of transitional barriers encountered by FENs. Methods: Six FENs within five years of their hire were interviewed. In addition, six clinical educators involved in developing transitional programs were interviewed. Also, four preceptors who had worked with FENs during initial orientation periods participated in this study. Semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions regarding adaptation experiences were used to understand the essence of the lived experiences of the FENs. The educators and preceptors were asked questions regarding their perceptions about FENs' transitional barriers and different issues concerning FENs' adaptation. The collected data were then transcribed, coded, and analyzed to identify central themes related to transitional barriers. Results: Communication was a central theme identified by all three groups as a key barrier to successful transition. Other identified barriers included differences in nursing practice compared to original countries of education, lack of cultural understanding, and issues arising from uninformed employment contracts. Barriers also varied based on the individual educational and professional experiences before arrival in the US. Implications: It is important to understand and address issues arising from language/ communication difficulty and differences in culture, and nursing practice to ensure patient safety and quality of care, as well as improve the job satisfaction of FENs. It may be more effective if planned interventions are based on countries of origin of FENs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransition Barriers of Foreign-Educated Nurses: Stakeholders' Perspectivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157658-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transition Barriers of Foreign-Educated Nurses: Stakeholders' Perspectives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thekdi, Prachi, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chandler Regional Medical Center, Telemetry Department</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">475 S. Dobson Road, Chandler, AZ, 85224, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480-522-4754</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pthekdi@asu.edu, prachi.thekdi@chw.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara Wilson, PhD, RNC, Associate Professor; Yu Xu, PhD, RN, CTN, CNE, Associate Professor/PhD Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study examined the experiences of foreign-educated nurses (FENs) working in a US health care system to identify core barriers encountered during their transition. In addition, it sought perspectives of multiple stakeholders to understand and validate these barriers. Background: An increasing number of FENs arrive in the United States every year to supplement its growing nursing shortage. Successful adaptation of FENs is an important issue that affects patient safety and quality of care. To ensure adaptation of FENs, it is important to develop an understanding of transitional barriers encountered by FENs. Methods: Six FENs within five years of their hire were interviewed. In addition, six clinical educators involved in developing transitional programs were interviewed. Also, four preceptors who had worked with FENs during initial orientation periods participated in this study. Semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions regarding adaptation experiences were used to understand the essence of the lived experiences of the FENs. The educators and preceptors were asked questions regarding their perceptions about FENs' transitional barriers and different issues concerning FENs' adaptation. The collected data were then transcribed, coded, and analyzed to identify central themes related to transitional barriers. Results: Communication was a central theme identified by all three groups as a key barrier to successful transition. Other identified barriers included differences in nursing practice compared to original countries of education, lack of cultural understanding, and issues arising from uninformed employment contracts. Barriers also varied based on the individual educational and professional experiences before arrival in the US. Implications: It is important to understand and address issues arising from language/ communication difficulty and differences in culture, and nursing practice to ensure patient safety and quality of care, as well as improve the job satisfaction of FENs. It may be more effective if planned interventions are based on countries of origin of FENs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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