2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157659
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Men's Knowledge and Awareness of Male Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Men's Knowledge and Awareness of Male Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Thomas, Eileen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:13120 E 19th Avenue Room 4311, C288-18, Aurora, CO, 80012, USA
Contact Telephone:303-724-8540
Co-Authors:Stephen Schoen, Student
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe men's knowledge and awareness of breast cancer in men who may be at high risk for developing this disease. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: According to the American Cancer Society, the key to surviving breast cancer is early detection and treatment. Due to the rarity of breast cancer in men, there are no recommended screening guidelines for males. Most people are not aware that in 2008 approximately 1,990 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and about 450 men will die from this disease. It is estimated that up to 20% of men who get breast cancer have a female relative with the disease. Nearly 1.3 million women are diagnosed with breast cancer worldwide each year; this means potentially 260,000 men have a female relative with breast cancer. Researchers suspect that some families may carry genetic mutations that provide an increased risk for breast cancer and found that BRCA-2 mutations appear to be a significant risk factor for breast cancer in men. In men, 15% to 20% with breast cancer have a positive family history, while only 7% of the male general population has an affected family member. Despite a recent decline in breast cancer mortality in women, the incidence of breast cancer among men is increasing.  Men are often diagnosed at a later, more advanced stage than women. Men with breast cancer are older, more likely to have hormone receptor positive disease, and nodal metastases.  Because of the low numbers of breast cancer in men compared to women, it is not reasonable to recommend mammography screening among men in the general population; however, regularly scheduled clinical breast exams might be useful for screening men with a family history of breast cancer and/or with BRCA-2 mutations found by genetic testing. Methods: Qualitative descriptive approaches with individual, face-to-face interviews are being used to explore men's knowledge of male breast cancer . Thirty men without a personal history of breast cancer, regardless of race/ethnicity, who have or have had a maternal blood relative (male or female) with a history of breast cancer, are being invited to participate in the study.  Researchers suggest that gender identities may be relevant to health and illness related experiences, therefore descriptive ethnography is the framework used in this preliminary study.  Results: Preliminary results indicate that a majority of men are not aware that men are at risk for breast cancer. Some participants stated, if they were diagnosed with breast cancer, they would feel stigmatized and would feel a loss of their masculinity. Participants recommend that educational information about male breast cancer be placed in locations where men gather, such as sport bars, golf courses, and sports arenas. Implications: Researchers have not addressed from a man's perspective their knowledge about a disease that is predominantly considered to be a woman's disease. Knowledge gained from this study will provide health care professionals with new perspectives and insights for developing culturally acceptable and gender specific breast cancer education interventions for men.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMen's Knowledge and Awareness of Male Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157659-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Men's Knowledge and Awareness of Male Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thomas, Eileen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">13120 E 19th Avenue Room 4311, C288-18, Aurora, CO, 80012, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-724-8540</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eileen.thomas@ucdenver.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Stephen Schoen, Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe men's knowledge and awareness of breast cancer in men who may be at high risk for developing this disease. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: According to the American Cancer Society, the key to surviving breast cancer is early detection and treatment. Due to the rarity of breast cancer in men, there are no recommended screening guidelines for males. Most people are not aware that in 2008 approximately 1,990 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and about 450 men will die from this disease. It is estimated that up to 20% of men who get breast cancer have a female relative with the disease. Nearly 1.3 million women are diagnosed with breast cancer worldwide each year; this means potentially 260,000 men have a female relative with breast cancer. Researchers suspect that some families may carry genetic mutations that provide an increased risk for breast cancer and found that BRCA-2 mutations appear to be a significant risk factor for breast cancer in men. In men, 15% to 20% with breast cancer have a positive family history, while only 7% of the male general population has an affected family member. Despite a recent decline in breast cancer mortality in women, the incidence of breast cancer among men is increasing. &nbsp;Men are often diagnosed at a later, more advanced stage than women. Men with breast cancer are older, more likely to have hormone receptor positive disease, and nodal metastases.&nbsp; Because of the low numbers of breast cancer in men compared to women, it is not reasonable to recommend mammography screening among men in the general population; however, regularly scheduled clinical breast exams might be useful for screening men with a family history of breast cancer and/or with BRCA-2 mutations found by genetic testing. Methods: Qualitative descriptive approaches with individual, face-to-face interviews are being used to explore men's knowledge of male breast cancer . Thirty men without a personal history of breast cancer, regardless of race/ethnicity, who have or have had a maternal blood relative (male or female) with a history of breast cancer, are being invited to participate in the study.&nbsp; Researchers suggest that gender identities may be relevant to health and illness related experiences, therefore descriptive ethnography is the framework used in this preliminary study.&nbsp; Results: Preliminary results indicate that a majority of men are not aware that men are at risk for breast cancer. Some participants stated, if they were diagnosed with breast cancer, they would feel stigmatized and would feel a loss of their masculinity. Participants recommend that educational information about male breast cancer be placed in locations where men gather, such as sport bars, golf courses, and sports arenas. Implications: Researchers have not addressed from a man's perspective their knowledge about a disease that is predominantly considered to be a woman's disease. Knowledge gained from this study will provide health care professionals with new perspectives and insights for developing culturally acceptable and gender specific breast cancer education interventions for men.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:04:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:04:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.