2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157662
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Care Utilization by Homeless HCV-Positive Adults
Abstract:
Health Care Utilization by Homeless HCV-Positive Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Tyler, Darlene F., RN, FNP, PhD(c)
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral student
Contact Address:700 Tiverton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA
Contact Telephone:213-673-4849
Co-Authors:Adeline Nyamathi, ANP, PhD, FAAN, Professor & Audrienne H. Moseley Endowed Chair in Community Health Research, Acting Assoc Dean for Research & Director of T32
Purpose: To assess general health care utilization, and in particular, HCV-related health care visits by HCV-positive homeless adults. Background: HCV infection is prevalent among homeless adults, with rates of infection ranging from 17% to 44%. Homeless adults often neglect preventive health care, prioritizing financial, addiction, and housing needs over health concerns. Determining whether homeless adults follow through with referrals for general health care as well as for HCV management and care is important when designing interventions for reducing their health outcome. Theoretical Framework: The Comprehensive Health Seeking and Coping Paradigm (CHSCP) model (Nyamathi, 1989) served as the theoretical framework for the study. The CHSCP has been used extensively to guide research on homeless men, women, and youth, and is a useful framework for conceptualizing factors that influence health behaviors and health outcomes among individuals. Methods: The health care utilization patterns of 106 HCV-positive homeless participants, who were randomized into one of three vaccine completion intervention programs, were reviewed for both general health care and HCV-related visits during the 6-month period between randomization and follow up. At entrance into the study, all participants who tested positive for the HCV antibody were given referral information for HCV follow-up care at one of several local homeless health care community clinics. At completion of the intervention, participants were asked if they had had any health care related visits in the previous 6 months, how many, where, and for what reason. Outcomes: The sample of HCV-positive homeless persons consisted of 83 males and 23 females; mean age was 45 years with 62% being African American. Nineteen HCV-positive participants reported a total of 77 general health care visits during the 6-month study period. Only 2 participants obtained HCV-related health care visits. Fifteen participants reported outpatient visits and 4 reported both outpatient visits and hospital admissions. Health care visits were categorized as follows: respiratory system (flu, bronchitis, lung testing); cardiovascular system (CAD, hypertension, pedal edema, anemia); diabetes; medication related; musculoskeletal-related; mental health; and other (stab wound). Logistical regression analysis showed that concurrent alcohol use and substance abuse were not related to whether or not participants received health care visits. Participants obtaining health care visits were distributed evenly between the three intervention program groups. The two HCV-positive participants belonged to different intervention program groups. Conclusion: The majority of homeless HCV-positive adults did not seek health care as referred for HCV management. Further research should focus on reasons for not obtaining health care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Care Utilization by Homeless HCV-Positive Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157662-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Care Utilization by Homeless HCV-Positive Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tyler, Darlene F., RN, FNP, PhD(c)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">700 Tiverton Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">213-673-4849</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dftyler@earthlink.net, dftyler1@verizon.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Adeline Nyamathi, ANP, PhD, FAAN, Professor &amp; Audrienne H. Moseley Endowed Chair in Community Health Research, Acting Assoc Dean for Research &amp; Director of T32</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To assess general health care utilization, and in particular, HCV-related health care visits by HCV-positive homeless adults. Background: HCV infection is prevalent among homeless adults, with rates of infection ranging from 17% to 44%. Homeless adults often neglect preventive health care, prioritizing financial, addiction, and housing needs over health concerns. Determining whether homeless adults follow through with referrals for general health care as well as for HCV management and care is important when designing interventions for reducing their health outcome. Theoretical Framework: The Comprehensive Health Seeking and Coping Paradigm (CHSCP) model (Nyamathi, 1989) served as the theoretical framework for the study. The CHSCP has been used extensively to guide research on homeless men, women, and youth, and is a useful framework for conceptualizing factors that influence health behaviors and health outcomes among individuals. Methods: The health care utilization patterns of 106 HCV-positive homeless participants, who were randomized into one of three vaccine completion intervention programs, were reviewed for both general health care and HCV-related visits during the 6-month period between randomization and follow up. At entrance into the study, all participants who tested positive for the HCV antibody were given referral information for HCV follow-up care at one of several local homeless health care community clinics. At completion of the intervention, participants were asked if they had had any health care related visits in the previous 6 months, how many, where, and for what reason. Outcomes: The sample of HCV-positive homeless persons consisted of 83 males and 23 females; mean age was 45 years with 62% being African American. Nineteen HCV-positive participants reported a total of 77 general health care visits during the 6-month study period. Only 2 participants obtained HCV-related health care visits. Fifteen participants reported outpatient visits and 4 reported both outpatient visits and hospital admissions. Health care visits were categorized as follows: respiratory system (flu, bronchitis, lung testing); cardiovascular system (CAD, hypertension, pedal edema, anemia); diabetes; medication related; musculoskeletal-related; mental health; and other (stab wound). Logistical regression analysis showed that concurrent alcohol use and substance abuse were not related to whether or not participants received health care visits. Participants obtaining health care visits were distributed evenly between the three intervention program groups. The two HCV-positive participants belonged to different intervention program groups. Conclusion: The majority of homeless HCV-positive adults did not seek health care as referred for HCV management. Further research should focus on reasons for not obtaining health care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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