2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157666
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Correlates of Participant Response Rate
Abstract:
Examining Correlates of Participant Response Rate
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Verran, Joyce A., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Professor Emeritus
Contact Address:7233 E. Montecito, Tucson, AZ, 85710, USA
Contact Telephone:520-349-6442
Co-Authors:Ya-Chuan Hsu, RN, MS, Doctoral Student
Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship of subject group response rate to measures of nursing work group culture and patient outcomes. Background and Problem: When conducting research at a group level unit of analysis, it is often necessary to measure variables at the individual level and then aggregate the data to the group level. To do so, a group response rate of at least 50% is needed to assume representativeness of the data. For research that uses the patient care unit as the unit of analysis, a number of factors in today's health care environment may interfere with the investigator's ability to achieve this level of response. Researchers have hypothesized that the level of staff response might be a proxy measure for a number of other construct, e.g., nursing staff culture, staffing variables, the degree of unit turbulence, or managerial support. In this presentation, we examine the relationship of culture variables to response rate. Because nursing culture has been shown to impact patient outcomes, the relationship of unit response rates to patient outcomes is also examined. Setting and Sample: Data used for the investigation were collected from 292 nursing staff members and 416 patients who received care on one of the 11 units that participated in substudy 1 of the DyNADS research project. Except for the criterion of representativeness, all data met criteria for aggregation to the unit level. Methods: Four variables have previously been shown to be indicators of Nursing Workgroup Culture and six patient outcomes were used for analysis. The four culture variables were Job Satisfaction (JS), Staff Communication (COMM), Control Over Nursing Practice (CONP), and Team Shared Responsibility (SR). The six patient outcomes were Simple Self Care (SSC), Complex Self-Care (CSC), Symptom Management Difference (SYM-DIF), Symptom Management Capacity (SYM-CAP), Total Patient Fall Rate (FALLS), and Adverse Drug Events (ADE). All nine variables were related to Unit Response Rates; Participant Response Rate ranged from 20% to 58%. Results: For the Culture variables, Response Rate showed a strong positive correlation with CONP and COMM, a moderate correlation with JS and a low correlation with SR. In terms of Patient Outcomes, Response Rate correlated moderately with CSC, SYMDIF, SYM-CAP, and ADE. The correlations for SYM-CAP and ADE were negative indicating that the greater the response rate, the fewer ADEs and the lower the patient's capacity to manage their symptoms. Additional regression analysis and an examination of differences between groups will be presented. Implications: It has long been believed that the response of subjects reflects factors that tend to influence group participation. Unfortunately, little has been done to investigate what that reflection might be. Given the cost and difficulty of collecting data from a large number of individuals, it is in the investigator's interest to utilize all possible data that may be available in a research study. This investigation provides some beginning evidence of what unit level response rate might reflect and could, therefore, be utilized in addition to or possibly in place of these factors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Correlates of Participant Response Rateen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157666-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining Correlates of Participant Response Rate</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Verran, Joyce A., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor Emeritus</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">7233 E. Montecito, Tucson, AZ, 85710, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-349-6442</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jverran@cox.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ya-Chuan Hsu, RN, MS, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationship of subject group response rate to measures of nursing work group culture and patient outcomes. Background and Problem: When conducting research at a group level unit of analysis, it is often necessary to measure variables at the individual level and then aggregate the data to the group level. To do so, a group response rate of at least 50% is needed to assume representativeness of the data. For research that uses the patient care unit as the unit of analysis, a number of factors in today's health care environment may interfere with the investigator's ability to achieve this level of response. Researchers have hypothesized that the level of staff response might be a proxy measure for a number of other construct, e.g., nursing staff culture, staffing variables, the degree of unit turbulence, or managerial support. In this presentation, we examine the relationship of culture variables to response rate. Because nursing culture has been shown to impact patient outcomes, the relationship of unit response rates to patient outcomes is also examined. Setting and Sample: Data used for the investigation were collected from 292 nursing staff members and 416 patients who received care on one of the 11 units that participated in substudy 1 of the DyNADS research project. Except for the criterion of representativeness, all data met criteria for aggregation to the unit level. Methods: Four variables have previously been shown to be indicators of Nursing Workgroup Culture and six patient outcomes were used for analysis. The four culture variables were Job Satisfaction (JS), Staff Communication (COMM), Control Over Nursing Practice (CONP), and Team Shared Responsibility (SR). The six patient outcomes were Simple Self Care (SSC), Complex Self-Care (CSC), Symptom Management Difference (SYM-DIF), Symptom Management Capacity (SYM-CAP), Total Patient Fall Rate (FALLS), and Adverse Drug Events (ADE). All nine variables were related to Unit Response Rates; Participant Response Rate ranged from 20% to 58%. Results: For the Culture variables, Response Rate showed a strong positive correlation with CONP and COMM, a moderate correlation with JS and a low correlation with SR. In terms of Patient Outcomes, Response Rate correlated moderately with CSC, SYMDIF, SYM-CAP, and ADE. The correlations for SYM-CAP and ADE were negative indicating that the greater the response rate, the fewer ADEs and the lower the patient's capacity to manage their symptoms. Additional regression analysis and an examination of differences between groups will be presented. Implications: It has long been believed that the response of subjects reflects factors that tend to influence group participation. Unfortunately, little has been done to investigate what that reflection might be. Given the cost and difficulty of collecting data from a large number of individuals, it is in the investigator's interest to utilize all possible data that may be available in a research study. This investigation provides some beginning evidence of what unit level response rate might reflect and could, therefore, be utilized in addition to or possibly in place of these factors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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