Patient Experiences of Diabetes Self-Management Support " The Influence of Literacy"

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157668
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Experiences of Diabetes Self-Management Support " The Influence of Literacy"
Abstract:
Patient Experiences of Diabetes Self-Management Support " The Influence of Literacy"
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wallace, Andrea S., PhD, ND, APRN-BC, ADM
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MSC 09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Contact Telephone:505-272-4142
Co-Authors:John R. Carlson, MS, Research Associate Professor; Darren A. DeWalt, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor; Robert M. Malone, PharmD, CDE, CPP, Assistant Professor
Background: Many diabetes patients receiving care in clinics that follow the Chronic Care Model continue to have poor outcomes.  Since a significant component of diabetes care depends on patient self-management, understanding variability in diabetes outcomes may rest on learning more about how patients experience self-care management support in clinical settings. This may be particularly relevant for understanding health disparities. Methods: Survey data were collected from 208 patients seen in a multi-disciplinary diabetes clinic including many elements of the Chronic Care Model. Multiple regression was used to test associations between demographic characteristics (race, gender), insurance status, literacy regarding health care  (inadequate/marginal vs. adequate), intensity of chronic illness management (tailored intervention guidelines determined by clinical status), and time with diabetes with patient-rated experiences of their self-care management support (Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care). Results: Literacy regarding health care is the only variable contributing significantly with 95% confidence to variation in patient ratings of their self-management support:  those with adequate literacy rate their self-management support higher than those with inadequate/marginal literacy (p < .01). Implications: Even when considering the objective intensity of health services delivered, literacy was the sole variable contributing to variability in patient ratings of the self-management support they received in this clinical setting.  These results suggest the need to address literacy as clinicians develop and communicate treatment plans requiring self-management skills. Secondarily, the lack of association between treatment intensity and patient ratings of self-management support call into question the validity of subjective ratings related to health care processes delivered. These finding may be important as policymakers continue to look toward consumer-based surveys to measure health care quality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Experiences of Diabetes Self-Management Support " The Influence of Literacy"en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157668-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patient Experiences of Diabetes Self-Management Support &quot; The Influence of Literacy&quot;</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wallace, Andrea S., PhD, ND, APRN-BC, ADM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC 09 5350, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-272-4142</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aswallace@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John R. Carlson, MS, Research Associate Professor; Darren A. DeWalt, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor; Robert M. Malone, PharmD, CDE, CPP, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Many diabetes patients receiving care in clinics that follow the Chronic Care Model continue to have poor outcomes.&nbsp; Since a significant component of diabetes care depends on patient self-management, understanding variability in diabetes outcomes may rest on learning more about how patients experience self-care management support in clinical settings. This may be particularly relevant for understanding health disparities. Methods: Survey data were collected from 208 patients seen in a multi-disciplinary diabetes clinic including many elements of the Chronic Care Model. Multiple regression was used to test associations between demographic characteristics (race, gender), insurance status, literacy regarding health care&nbsp; (inadequate/marginal vs. adequate), intensity of chronic illness management (tailored intervention guidelines determined by clinical status), and time with diabetes with patient-rated experiences of their self-care management support (Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care). Results: Literacy regarding health care is the only variable contributing significantly with 95% confidence to variation in patient ratings of their self-management support:&nbsp; those with adequate literacy rate their self-management support higher than those with inadequate/marginal literacy (p &lt; .01).&nbsp;Implications: Even when considering the objective intensity of health services delivered, literacy was the sole variable contributing to variability in patient ratings of the self-management support they received in this clinical setting.&nbsp; These results suggest the need to address literacy as clinicians develop and communicate treatment plans requiring self-management skills. Secondarily, the lack of association between treatment intensity and patient ratings of self-management support call into question the validity of subjective ratings related to health care processes delivered. These finding may be important as policymakers continue to look toward consumer-based surveys to measure health care quality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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