2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157669
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Testing a Peer-Based Symptom Management Intervention for Women With HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Testing a Peer-Based Symptom Management Intervention for Women With HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Webel, Allison R., RN, BSN, BA
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, N531C, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA
Contact Telephone:415-753-0146
Co-Authors:Bill Holzemer, Professor; Kate Lorig, RN, DrPH, Professor; Carmen Portillo, Professor; Sally Rankin, Professor and Chair
Aim: The aim of this study was to test the impact of participation in a Peer Based Intervention for Symptom Management (PRISM-HIV) for women living with HIV infection on selected outcome measures including,  symptom intensity, medication adherence, viral control and  quality of life. Background: Globally women, especially young women, are the fasting growing population being infected with HIV. Women living with HIV/AIDS are challenged to manage the symptoms of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. Previous research has described the symptom experience of women with HIV/AIDS and its consequences on the quality of their life. However, no studies have been located that have explored the benefits of utilizing a peer-led intervention program to help facilitate symptom self-management in women with HIV/AIDS. Methods: The PRISM-HIV study is a 14-week, randomized controlled study with a run-in period. Participants were recruited using a convenient, consecutive sampling method. Those participants randomized to the experimental condition attended seven, peer-led sessions over seven weeks. Participants randomized to the control condition will received a copy of HIV Symptom Management Strategies: A Manual for People Living with HIV/AIDS. Participants completed four surveys assessing change over change in the aforementioned outcome variables. Results: To date, 84 of the anticipated 126 participants have been recruited with 45 randomized to the intervention group and 39 to the control group. Of those, 53 participants have finished the final survey.  The effect of the intervention on symptom intensity, medication adherence, viral control and  quality of life will be presented. Recommendations will be made regarding community-based, peer-led interventions in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTesting a Peer-Based Symptom Management Intervention for Women With HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157669-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Testing a Peer-Based Symptom Management Intervention for Women With HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Webel, Allison R., RN, BSN, BA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, N531C, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-753-0146</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">allison.webel@ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bill Holzemer, Professor; Kate Lorig, RN, DrPH, Professor; Carmen Portillo, Professor; Sally Rankin, Professor and Chair</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: The aim of this study was to test the impact of participation in a Peer Based Intervention for Symptom Management (PRISM-HIV) for women living with HIV infection on selected outcome measures including,&nbsp; symptom intensity, medication adherence, viral control and&nbsp; quality of life. Background: Globally women, especially young women, are the fasting growing population being infected with HIV. Women living with HIV/AIDS are challenged to manage the symptoms of HIV/AIDS and its treatment. Previous research has described the symptom experience of women with HIV/AIDS and its consequences on the quality of their life. However, no studies have been located that have explored the benefits of utilizing a peer-led intervention program to help facilitate symptom self-management in women with HIV/AIDS. Methods: The PRISM-HIV study is a 14-week, randomized controlled study with a run-in period. Participants were recruited using a convenient, consecutive sampling method. Those participants randomized to the experimental condition attended seven, peer-led sessions over seven weeks. Participants randomized to the control condition will received a copy of HIV Symptom Management Strategies: A Manual for People Living with HIV/AIDS. Participants completed four surveys assessing change over change in the aforementioned outcome variables. Results: To date, 84 of the anticipated 126 participants have been recruited with 45 randomized to the intervention group and 39 to the control group. Of those, 53 participants have finished the final survey.&nbsp; The effect of the intervention on symptom intensity, medication adherence, viral control and&nbsp; quality of life will be presented. Recommendations will be made regarding community-based, peer-led interventions in this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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