2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157673
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Psychosocial Outcomes
Abstract:
The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Psychosocial Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Weinert, Clarann, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA
Contact Telephone:406-994-2782
Purpose/Aims: The aims of this paper are to describe the psychosocial outcomes "acceptance of illness, stress, and depression" and the related factors associated with depression as experienced by group of persons exposed to Libby asbestos. Background: Stress and depression commonly accompany chronic illnesses and can impair the ability to cope, detract from the quality of life, impact domestic relationships, reduce occupational performance, impose economic strains, and undermine personal resources. How well a person is able to accept a chronic illness is critical in their ability to adapt and to engage in self-health management leading to healthy living despite a serious health concern. Likewise, an understanding of the relation of stress and depression in persons exposed to Libby asbestos can affect the provision of quality care. Methods: An aim of the study was to describe the bio-psychosocial health status of exposed persons who are clients at the CARD clinic. Participants completed an electronic questionnaire including measures of acceptance of illness (Acceptance of Illness Scale), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), depression (CES-D), financial health care resources and health care accessibility (Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire), and the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Results: The mean scores were: acceptance of illness 47.42 (sd=7.40), stress 20.90 (sd=8.93, and CES-D 13.36 (sd=10.7). Scores on these key psychosocial variables were comparable to other groups experiencing a long-term health problem. Multiple regression was employed to understand the impact of financial, psychosocial, and respiratory morbidity variables on depression for 436 study participants. Variables of interest included all three subscales of the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ): symptoms (x=51.5, sd=24.8), activity (x=50.0, sd=27.6), and impacts (x=27.8, sd=22.0); acceptance of illness (x=47.5, sd=7.3); stress (x=20.8, sd=8.9); perception of financial health care resources (x=22.8, sd=7.2); and perception of health care accessibility (x=42.5, sd=6.9). Overall, the model was successful in accounting for meaningful variance F(7, 428)=106.3, p=0.00 and R2=0.64. Three of the variables contributed significantly to the prediction of depression including impacts (B=0.27, p=0.00), stress (B=0.56, p=0.00), and perceived access to health care (B=-0.091, p=0.02). Implications: Depression can be very debilitating interfering with many aspects of the individual's life. Understanding the factors, such as stress, that are associated with depression can assist providers, including those at the CARD clinic, to better work with persons in managing their chronic illness and promoting socio-emotional health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Psychosocial Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157673-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Libby Asbestos Health Status Study: Psychosocial Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Weinert, Clarann, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3560, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-994-2782</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cweinert@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The aims of this paper are to describe the psychosocial outcomes &quot;acceptance of illness, stress, and depression&quot; and the related factors associated with depression as experienced by group of persons exposed to Libby asbestos. Background: Stress and depression commonly accompany chronic illnesses and can impair the ability to cope, detract from the quality of life, impact domestic relationships, reduce occupational performance, impose economic strains, and undermine personal resources. How well a person is able to accept a chronic illness is critical in their ability to adapt and to engage in self-health management leading to healthy living despite a serious health concern. Likewise, an understanding of the relation of stress and depression in persons exposed to Libby asbestos can affect the provision of quality care. Methods: An aim of the study was to describe the bio-psychosocial health status of exposed persons who are clients at the CARD clinic. Participants completed an electronic questionnaire including measures of acceptance of illness (Acceptance of Illness Scale), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), depression (CES-D), financial health care resources and health care accessibility (Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire), and the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Results: The mean scores were: acceptance of illness 47.42 (sd=7.40), stress 20.90 (sd=8.93, and CES-D 13.36 (sd=10.7). Scores on these key psychosocial variables were comparable to other groups experiencing a long-term health problem. Multiple regression was employed to understand the impact of financial, psychosocial, and respiratory morbidity variables on depression for 436 study participants. Variables of interest included all three subscales of the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ): symptoms (x=51.5, sd=24.8), activity (x=50.0, sd=27.6), and impacts (x=27.8, sd=22.0); acceptance of illness (x=47.5, sd=7.3); stress (x=20.8, sd=8.9); perception of financial health care resources (x=22.8, sd=7.2); and perception of health care accessibility (x=42.5, sd=6.9). Overall, the model was successful in accounting for meaningful variance F(7, 428)=106.3, p=0.00 and R2=0.64. Three of the variables contributed significantly to the prediction of depression including impacts (B=0.27, p=0.00), stress (B=0.56, p=0.00), and perceived access to health care (B=-0.091, p=0.02). Implications: Depression can be very debilitating interfering with many aspects of the individual's life. Understanding the factors, such as stress, that are associated with depression can assist providers, including those at the CARD clinic, to better work with persons in managing their chronic illness and promoting socio-emotional health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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