2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157674
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recognizing Role Stress in Part-Time Clinical Affiliate Nursing Faculty
Abstract:
Recognizing Role Stress in Part-Time Clinical Affiliate Nursing Faculty
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Whalen, Kathleen S., PhD, RN, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:Regis University, Loretto Heights School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:3333 Regis Boulevard , G-8, Denver, CO, 80221-1099, USA
Contact Telephone:720-212-9270
Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of role stress on role strain among part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty in baccalaureate nursing education settings. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Baccalaureate nursing programs have become more dependent on part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty to teach nursing students during clinical rotations. Clinical faculty have many reasons for experiencing work-related stress, role strain, and potential burnout. Schools of nursing must identify the types of potential role stress and role strain that may lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout and find ways to increase job satisfaction for this vital group of teachers. Methods: This inquiry was based on a non-probability sample of 91 participants that worked in baccalaureate university settings in a Western state. The research instruments included a researcher-generated background factors survey; the researcher's modified version of Mobily's (1987) Role Strain Scale, the Potential Work-Related Stressors Survey (PSS); and Bowling Green State University's (1997) abridged Job In General (aJIG) index. By using a multivariate correlational research design and path analysis methodology, the researcher examined the relationships between selected background factors (number of years of experience as a clinical teacher, clinical teacher training, and holding a second job), role stress, and  role strain (as measured by the degree of job satisfaction) among part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty and tested the validity of the researcher's Part-time Clinical Affiliate Nursing Faculty Model of Role Stress and Role Strain. Results:  The overall means for role stress (2.54) and the aJIG (47.95) implied that the faculty experienced a low level of stress and a high job satisfaction, respectively. Significant paths were found between role stress and job satisfaction (Beta = -.296, p < 0.05) and between number of hours worked a week with a second job and job satisfaction (beta = .218, p < 0.05). In a post-hoc regression analysis, role incongruity (beta = -.396, p = < 0.05) as well as role incompetence (Beta = -.278, p = <0.05) were significant in having a predictive influence on job satisfaction. In addition to rating the work-related situations listed in the PSS instrument, participants answered an open-ended question and identified other work-related situations that were all rated by the respondents as being moderate or high level stressors. Implications: This study contributed to the advancement of nursing education knowledge by providing scientific data for predictors of role strain (as measured by the degree of job satisfaction) by pointing out the effects of role stress in the path model and role incongruity and role incompetence in a post-hoc analysis of these variables. Given the small percentage of explained variance provided by the model, further research is required to look at other paths that could contribute to role stress and role strain in the part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecognizing Role Stress in Part-Time Clinical Affiliate Nursing Facultyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157674-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recognizing Role Stress in Part-Time Clinical Affiliate Nursing Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Whalen, Kathleen S., PhD, RN, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Regis University, Loretto Heights School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Regis Boulevard , G-8, Denver, CO, 80221-1099, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">720-212-9270</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kwhalen@regis.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of role stress on role strain among part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty in baccalaureate nursing education settings. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Baccalaureate nursing programs have become more dependent on part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty to teach nursing students during clinical rotations. Clinical faculty have many reasons for experiencing work-related stress, role strain, and potential burnout. Schools of nursing must identify the types of potential role stress and role strain that may lead to job dissatisfaction and burnout and find ways to increase job satisfaction for this vital group of teachers. Methods: This inquiry was based on a non-probability sample of 91 participants that worked in baccalaureate university settings in a Western state. The research instruments included a researcher-generated background factors survey; the researcher's modified version of Mobily's (1987) Role Strain Scale, the Potential Work-Related Stressors Survey (PSS); and Bowling Green State University's (1997) abridged Job In General (aJIG) index. By using a multivariate correlational research design and path analysis methodology, the researcher examined the relationships between selected background factors (number of years of experience as a clinical teacher, clinical teacher training, and holding a second job), role stress, and&nbsp; role strain (as measured by the degree of job satisfaction) among part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty and tested the validity of the researcher's Part-time Clinical Affiliate Nursing Faculty Model of Role Stress and Role Strain. Results: &nbsp;The overall means for role stress (2.54) and the aJIG (47.95) implied that the faculty experienced a low level of stress and a high job satisfaction, respectively. Significant paths were found between role stress and job satisfaction (Beta = -.296, p &lt; 0.05) and between number of hours worked a week with a second job and job satisfaction (beta = .218, p &lt; 0.05). In a post-hoc regression analysis, role incongruity (beta = -.396, p = &lt; 0.05) as well as role incompetence (Beta = -.278, p = &lt;0.05) were significant in having a predictive influence on job satisfaction. In addition to rating the work-related situations listed in the PSS instrument, participants answered an open-ended question and identified other work-related situations that were all rated by the respondents as being moderate or high level stressors. Implications: This study contributed to the advancement of nursing education knowledge by providing scientific data for predictors of role strain (as measured by the degree of job satisfaction) by pointing out the effects of role stress in the path model and role incongruity and role incompetence in a post-hoc analysis of these variables. Given the small percentage of explained variance provided by the model, further research is required to look at other paths that could contribute to role stress and role strain in the part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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