2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157675
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concept Analysis: Invincibility
Abstract:
Concept Analysis: Invincibility
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wickman, Mary, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Fullerton, Department of Nursing
Title:Director, Pre-licensure Programs
Contact Address:PO Box 6868, Fullerton, CA, 92834, USA
Contact Telephone:714-278-2126
Purpose/Aims: The specific aim of this paper is to analyze the concept, invincibility and to explore this concept in relationship to the problem of adolescent risk behaviors. Description of Theory/Concept: The concept of invincibility has been identified as a phase of the social-cognitive development of the adolescent and has also been associated with a propensity to engage in high-risk behaviors in both teens and adults. The common adolescent belief of invincibility may lead to the perception that the consequences of high-risk behavior will not happen to them (Deas-Nesmith, Brady, White, & Campbell, 1998; Greene, Krcmar, Walters, Rubin, & Hale, 2000).  Morbidity and mortality statistics, however, indicate otherwise. High-risk behaviors have significant adverse outcomes for teens including infection with sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the human immunodeficiency (HIV) virus, temporary and permanent injury and disability, and even death (American Lung Association, 2004; Biddlecom, 2004;  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2003, 2006).  While invincibility has been identified as a noted characteristic of adolescent thinking (Elkind, 1967; Elkind, 1970; Cvetkovich, 1975; Piaget, 1970), a review of the literature indicated that a valid and reliable tool to measure the concept of invincibility had not been developed for an adolescent population.  A concept analysis of invincibility was a necessary first step in the development of a tool to measure invincibility in this population. Internal Consistency of the Concept Analysis Approach Used: The concept analysis approach defined by Walker and Avant (1995, 2005) is used in determining defining attributes of the concept invincibility. Limitations are discussed, contrary and related cases are identified, and antecedents, consequences, empirical referents of the concept invincibility are discussed. Logic Linking the Concept to Nursing Practice or Research: The focus of this paper on the concept invincibility is an important concept that can be applied to nursing practice in a variety of settings. In acute care, community, and school-based settings, nursing has the opportunity to educate teens and adults regarding healthy behaviors that may prevent future risk-taking behaviors. Conclusions: The analysis of the concept invincibility was used as a beginning step in developing an instrument that may prove useful in screening and intervening with teens to reduce harm related to high-risk behaviors.  The findings from this analysis and screening tool can be used in a variety of settings to identify teens and adults with a higher propensity towards invincible thinking in risky situations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcept Analysis: Invincibilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157675-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Concept Analysis: Invincibility</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wickman, Mary, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Fullerton, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, Pre-licensure Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 6868, Fullerton, CA, 92834, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">714-278-2126</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mwickman@fullerton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The specific aim of this paper is to analyze the concept, invincibility and to explore this concept in relationship to the problem of adolescent risk behaviors. Description of Theory/Concept: The concept of invincibility has been identified as a phase of the social-cognitive development of the adolescent and has also been associated with a propensity to engage in high-risk behaviors in both teens and adults. The common adolescent belief of invincibility may lead to the perception that the consequences of high-risk behavior will not happen to them (Deas-Nesmith, Brady, White, &amp; Campbell, 1998; Greene, Krcmar, Walters, Rubin, &amp; Hale, 2000).&nbsp; Morbidity and mortality statistics, however, indicate otherwise. High-risk behaviors have significant adverse outcomes for teens including infection with sexually transmitted infections (STIs), the human immunodeficiency (HIV) virus, temporary and permanent injury and disability, and even death (American Lung Association, 2004; Biddlecom, 2004; &nbsp;Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2003, 2006).&nbsp; While invincibility has been identified as a noted characteristic of adolescent thinking (Elkind, 1967; Elkind, 1970; Cvetkovich, 1975; Piaget, 1970), a review of the literature indicated that a valid and reliable tool to measure the concept of invincibility had not been developed for an adolescent population.&nbsp; A concept analysis of invincibility was a necessary first step in the development of a tool to measure invincibility in this population. Internal Consistency of the Concept Analysis Approach Used: The concept analysis approach defined by Walker and Avant (1995, 2005) is used in determining defining attributes of the concept invincibility. Limitations are discussed, contrary and related cases are identified, and antecedents, consequences, empirical referents of the concept invincibility are discussed. Logic Linking the Concept to Nursing Practice or Research: The focus of this paper on the concept invincibility is an important concept that can be applied to nursing practice in a variety of settings. In acute care, community, and school-based settings, nursing has the opportunity to educate teens and adults regarding healthy behaviors that may prevent future risk-taking behaviors. Conclusions: The analysis of the concept invincibility was used as a beginning step in developing an instrument that may prove useful in screening and intervening with teens to reduce harm related to high-risk behaviors.&nbsp; The findings from this analysis and screening tool can be used in a variety of settings to identify teens and adults with a higher propensity towards invincible thinking in risky situations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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