Health Disparities in Factors Contributing to Overweight in California Adolescents?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157676
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Disparities in Factors Contributing to Overweight in California Adolescents?
Abstract:
Health Disparities in Factors Contributing to Overweight in California Adolescents?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wilkosz, Mary Ellen, APRN-BC, PHN, FNP, PHDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, Room 411Y, San Francisco, CA, 94943-0606, USA
Contact Telephone:415-892-2244
Co-Authors:Jyu-Lin Chen, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Background: Several physical and psychosocial health consequences are associated with childhood obesity. Obesity tracks from adolescence into adulthood, approximately 70% of obese adolescents will be obese adults. However, little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the factors related to overweight among adolescents in California. Therefore, the study aims to examine factors including physical activity, sedentary activity, breakfast consumption, SES, parental education level, gender and age that contributed to increased body mass index (BMI) in adolescents age 12-17 from the California Health Inventory Survey 2005. Methods:  A secondary data analysis using the 2005 Adolescent California Health Interview Survey (n = 4029), a population based random digital dial telephone survey, was utilized. Telephone interviews were conducted and data was collected. The variables of interest include gender and age specific BMI, number of days physically active for 60 minutes per day, average number of screen hours /day (sum of computer and television time), breakfast consumption, parental education level, household income, and ethnicity.  Single as well as multiple logistic regression models were used to describe the relationships between the variables listed and increased BMI. Results: The average age of the study participants is 14.41 years.  37.2 % of Latinos, 22.4% of Whites and 19% of Asian adolescents were considered OW (BMI > 85th %tile). Preliminary results indicate that males are 1.65 times more likely to be OW than females.  Latinos are more likely to be OW than whites or Asians (OR 2.048, 2.526) respectively. The odds of being OW are 0.951 times less as you get older. There is a 1.23 times greater chance of being OW if an individual does not exercise for 60 minutes per day on more than three days per week and individuals whose screen time is 2 hours or greater per day are more likely (1.29) to be OW.  Household incomes below the 200% Federal Poverty Level were twice as likely to be overweight compared to higher income groups. The more days an individual eats breakfast/week, the less likely (0.912) they are to be OW. Conclusion: Further data will be analyzed to explore the ethnic differences among the factors described in the preliminary results. The preliminary findings indicate that culturally-appropriate programs to prevent childhood obesity and improve healthy lifestyles are warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Disparities in Factors Contributing to Overweight in California Adolescents?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157676-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Disparities in Factors Contributing to Overweight in California Adolescents?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilkosz, Mary Ellen, APRN-BC, PHN, FNP, PHDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, Room 411Y, San Francisco, CA, 94943-0606, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415-892-2244</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mewilkosz@comcast.net, wilkosz@sonoma.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jyu-Lin Chen, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Several physical and psychosocial health consequences are associated with childhood obesity. Obesity tracks from adolescence into adulthood, approximately 70% of obese adolescents will be obese adults. However, little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the factors related to overweight among adolescents in California. Therefore, the study aims to examine factors including physical activity, sedentary activity, breakfast consumption, SES, parental education level, gender and age that contributed to increased body mass index (BMI) in adolescents age 12-17 from the California Health Inventory Survey 2005. Methods:&nbsp; A secondary data analysis using the 2005 Adolescent California Health Interview Survey (n = 4029), a population based random digital dial telephone survey, was utilized. Telephone interviews were conducted and data was collected. The variables of interest include gender and age specific BMI, number of days physically active for 60 minutes per day, average number of screen hours /day (sum of computer and television time), breakfast consumption, parental education level, household income, and ethnicity.&nbsp; Single as well as multiple logistic regression models were used to describe the relationships between the variables listed and increased BMI. Results: The average age of the study participants is 14.41 years.&nbsp; 37.2 % of Latinos, 22.4% of Whites and 19% of Asian adolescents were considered OW (BMI &gt; 85th %tile). Preliminary results indicate that males are 1.65 times more likely to be OW than females.&nbsp; Latinos are more likely to be OW than whites or Asians (OR 2.048, 2.526) respectively. The odds of being OW are 0.951 times less as you get older.&nbsp;There is a 1.23 times greater chance of being OW if an individual does not exercise for 60 minutes per day on more than three days per week and individuals whose screen time is 2 hours or greater per day are more likely (1.29) to be OW.&nbsp; Household incomes below the 200% Federal Poverty Level were twice as likely to be overweight compared to higher income groups.&nbsp;The more days an individual eats breakfast/week, the less likely (0.912) they are to be OW. Conclusion: Further data will be analyzed to explore the ethnic differences among the factors described in the preliminary results.&nbsp;The preliminary findings indicate that culturally-appropriate programs to prevent childhood obesity and improve healthy lifestyles are warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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