2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157678
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors in Hawaii
Abstract:
Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors in Hawaii
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Williams, Paulette L., DrPH, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene
Title:Principal Investigator
Contact Address:2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster Hall 412, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA
Contact Telephone:808-956-5234
Purpose: This descriptive cross-sectional study describes the quality of life and explores the needs of breast cancer survivors living in. Background: Breast cancer continues to be the most frequently diagnosed cancer among American woman claiming more than 40,000 lives each year. With more focus on breast cancer prevention and early detection, the number of breast cancer survivors are increasing, with over two million breast cancer survivors currently living in the ( of [CDC], 2004). Similar to the national statistics, breast cancer survivor rate is also increasing. While approximately 800 women are diagnosed annually with breast cancer in,  seven out of every ten cases are detected at an early stage which contributes to a high survivor rate (ASC, 2005). Traditionally health care professionals have focused on the acute episode of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer patients while little attention has been given to the needs and quality of life of breast cancer survivors. Methods: A convenience sample of women breast cancer survivors was recruited at Susan G. Komen for the Cure Survivors' Conference and Race for the Cure to participate in the study. After obtaining informed consent, the participants were asked to complete the City of, 46-item Quality of Life (QOL) Instrument - Breast Cancer Version. The domains of the survey included physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being. Participants who responded on the survey that they wanted to participate in a focus group were telephonically contacted. Three focus groups were established according to years of survivorship after diagnosis: Group1, 1 year or less; Group 2, 2 - 5 years; and Group 3, greater than 6 years were interviewed by the PI  using Ferrell's Quality of Life semi-structured questions to obtain information on the coping strategies and needs of breast cancer survivors. The recorded interviews were transcribed and coded by a team of graduate students who then came to consensus on the emerging themes. Results: The mean age of the 47 breast cancer survivors who completed the survey was 56 years (range 38-75 years) with mean years of survivorship of six years. The mean stage at diagnosis was Stage 2. Forty-five percent of the survivors had at least two years of college and 85% were of Asian-Pacific ethnicity (22.5% Native Hawaiian, 22% Chinese, 15% Filipino, & 12.5 % Native American). There was not a significant difference between the three groups on the QOL scores (F = 0.331; df = 2, 40; p = 0.720). The overall QOL score was 5.61 +/- 0.82 with longest survivor's group scoring highest in spiritual well-being and the shortest survivor group scoring lowest in physical well-being. "Time matters", "family matters", and "spiritual rebirth" were the main themes that emerged from the group interviews. All groups verbalize making changes to their lifestyle that created more family time. The longer survivors found the use of healing touch and other holistic nursing interventions very useful to their recovery. Implications: Findings of this study of Hawaiian women suggest a need for greater attention to genetic counseling and integration of complementary medicine interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors in Hawaiien_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157678-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors in Hawaii</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Paulette L., DrPH, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2528 McCarthy Mall, Webster Hall 412, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">808-956-5234</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">paulette@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This descriptive cross-sectional study describes the quality of life and explores the needs of breast cancer survivors living in. Background: Breast cancer continues to be the most frequently diagnosed cancer among American woman claiming more than 40,000 lives each year. With more focus on breast cancer prevention and early detection, the number of breast cancer survivors are increasing, with over two million breast cancer survivors currently living in the ( of [CDC], 2004). Similar to the national statistics, breast cancer survivor rate is also increasing. While approximately 800 women are diagnosed annually with breast cancer in,&nbsp; seven out of every ten cases are detected at an early stage which contributes to a high survivor rate (ASC, 2005). Traditionally health care professionals have focused on the acute episode of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer patients while little attention has been given to the needs and quality of life of breast cancer survivors. Methods: A convenience sample of women breast cancer survivors was recruited at Susan G. Komen for the Cure Survivors' Conference and Race for the Cure to participate in the study. After obtaining informed consent, the participants were asked to complete the City of, 46-item Quality of Life (QOL) Instrument - Breast Cancer Version. The domains of the survey included physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being. Participants who responded on the survey that they wanted to participate in a focus group were telephonically contacted. Three focus groups were established according to years of survivorship after diagnosis: Group1, 1 year or less; Group 2, 2 - 5 years; and Group 3, greater than 6 years were interviewed by the PI &nbsp;using Ferrell's Quality of Life semi-structured questions to obtain information on the coping strategies and needs of breast cancer survivors. The recorded interviews were transcribed and coded by a team of graduate students who then came to consensus on the emerging themes. Results: The mean age of the 47 breast cancer survivors who completed the survey was 56 years (range 38-75 years) with mean years of survivorship of six years. The mean stage at diagnosis was Stage 2. Forty-five percent of the survivors had at least two years of college and 85% were of Asian-Pacific ethnicity (22.5% Native Hawaiian, 22% Chinese, 15% Filipino, &amp; 12.5 % Native American). There was not a significant difference between the three groups on the QOL scores (F = 0.331; df = 2, 40; p = 0.720). The overall QOL score was 5.61 +/- 0.82 with longest survivor's group scoring highest in spiritual well-being and the shortest survivor group scoring lowest in physical well-being. &quot;Time matters&quot;, &quot;family matters&quot;, and &quot;spiritual rebirth&quot; were the main themes that emerged from the group interviews. All groups verbalize making changes to their lifestyle that created more family time. The longer survivors found the use of healing touch and other holistic nursing interventions very useful to their recovery. Implications: Findings of this study of Hawaiian women suggest a need for greater attention to genetic counseling and integration of complementary medicine interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:05:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:05:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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