2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wise Women Against Diabetes
Abstract:
Wise Women Against Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Williams, Tammy L., PhD, RN, MBA, CLNC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1605 N Forgeus Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85716, USA
Contact Telephone:520-909-7004
An estimated 20.8 million people in the US has diabetes and of those, 90-95% has Type 2 diabetes. Meeting the recommended levels of physical activity has been shown to be beneficial in the management of Type 2 diabetes.  Nearly one-third of individuals with Type 2 diabetes report no involvement in regular physical activity, while another 38% report insufficient levels of physical activity.  Women who suffer from Type 2 diabetes often become frustrated and relapse to a sedentary lifestyle. Therefore, moderate physical activity, such as walking, is an ideal form of physical activity for this population. Healthcare providers often use counseling techniques to promote physical activity among patients. The majority of patients who receive physical activity counseling are males. Purpose:  This study tested the effectiveness of a Walking Intervention and Supportive Environment (WISE) protocol designed to increase the amount of walking and frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose in Type 2 diabetic women.  This intervention is guided by the Health Promotion Model and the Transtheoretical Model of Change. Method:  A quasi-experimental repeated measures design was used with a sample of 50 women ages 25 to 70 diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Participants were randomized to intervention group (n=25) or control group (n=25).  The intervention group received the WISE protocol, a weekly telephone counseling session tailored to the participants? stage of change.  The counseling was designed to provide support and motivation to increase walking, frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose and glycemic control.  All participants received usual care by their provider, educational material, pedometers and glucometers. Data Analysis: Statistical analysis (ANOVA and ANCOVA) was used to determine significant differences between the control and intervention group on mean daily steps walked, mean frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG), and glycemic control (Hemoglobin A1c levels).Descriptive statistics were used to summarize sample characteristics. Findings: Women receiving the WISE intervention significantly increased their mean frequency of SMBG and improved their glycemic control. Both groups had significant increases in their mean number of steps walked per day. Implications:  The knowledge obtained from this study will assist in further development of effective healthcare interventions aimed at reducing diabetes related complications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWise Women Against Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Wise Women Against Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Tammy L., PhD, RN, MBA, CLNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1605 N Forgeus Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85716, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-909-7004</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">TLWWL@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">An estimated 20.8 million people in the US has diabetes and of those, 90-95% has Type 2 diabetes. Meeting the recommended levels of physical activity has been shown to be beneficial in the management of Type 2 diabetes.&nbsp; Nearly one-third of individuals with Type 2 diabetes report no involvement in regular physical activity, while another 38% report insufficient levels of physical activity.&nbsp; Women who suffer from Type 2 diabetes often become frustrated and relapse to a sedentary lifestyle. Therefore, moderate physical activity, such as walking, is an ideal form of physical activity for this population. Healthcare providers often use counseling techniques to promote physical activity among patients. The majority of patients who receive physical activity counseling are males.&nbsp;Purpose:&nbsp; This study tested the effectiveness of a Walking Intervention and Supportive Environment (WISE) protocol designed to increase the amount of walking and frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose in Type 2 diabetic women.&nbsp; This intervention is guided by the Health Promotion Model and the Transtheoretical Model of Change. Method:&nbsp; A quasi-experimental repeated measures design was used with a sample of 50 women ages 25 to 70 diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Participants were randomized to intervention group (n=25) or control group (n=25).&nbsp; The intervention group received the WISE protocol, a weekly telephone counseling session tailored to the participants? stage of change.&nbsp; The counseling was designed to provide support and motivation to increase walking, frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose and glycemic control.&nbsp; All participants received usual care by their provider, educational material, pedometers and glucometers. Data Analysis: Statistical analysis (ANOVA and ANCOVA) was used to determine significant differences between the control and intervention group on mean daily steps walked, mean frequency of self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG), and glycemic control (Hemoglobin A1c levels).Descriptive statistics were used to summarize sample characteristics. Findings: Women receiving the WISE intervention significantly increased their mean frequency of SMBG and improved their glycemic control. Both groups had significant increases in their mean number of steps walked per day. Implications: &nbsp;The knowledge obtained from this study will assist in further development of effective healthcare interventions aimed at reducing diabetes related complications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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