2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157681
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Overview: The Libby Asbestos Story: Outcomes of a Rural Disaster
Abstract:
Overview: The Libby Asbestos Story: Outcomes of a Rural Disaster
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Winters, Charlene A., PhD, ACNS-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-4608
Between 1924 and 1990, nearly 6 million tons of asbestos-tainted vermiculite ore was mined and processed in Libby, Montana and distributed nationally to 28 processing and manufacturing plants now listed as priority asbestos contamination sites. The commercial products contaminated with Libby asbestos, including building supplies, insulation, and soil amendments, were widely used throughout Libby and distributed to over 200 sites across the US. Employees, families, and community members working, living, or recreating in close proximity to mining or manufacturing sites have suffered increased risk of developing asbestos-related disease (ARD) through primary or secondary exposures to asbestos. As a result of the commercial distribution of vermiculite products, schools, businesses, and as many as 35 million homes in the US may contain asbestos-contaminated insulation and other products. Using community-based participatory research principles, academic researchers and rural clinicians from Libby collaborated on a study to understand the bio-psychosocial health status, health care access, and financial needs of a national cohort of individuals exposed to Libby asbestos. The research was conducted in direct response to needs raised by rural clinicians at the Center for Asbestos Related Disease and a national call for improved rural health policy. In this symposium, researchers will report findings from the Libby Asbestos Health Status Study. The environmental disaster and health needs that provided the foundation for the research will be described in the first paper. The physical health outcomes with a specific focus on respiratory morbidity and the psychosocial outcomes and the related factors associated with depression provide the context for the second and third papers, respectively. In the last paper, the perception of access and financial aspects of care and rural health policy implications will be described. The findings presented from this comprehensive assessment of bio-psychosocial health status and health service needs of persons with confirmed asbestos exposure can help clinicians, educators, researchers, and policymakers understand the effects of this toxic exposure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOverview: The Libby Asbestos Story: Outcomes of a Rural Disasteren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157681-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Overview: The Libby Asbestos Story: Outcomes of a Rural Disaster</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winters, Charlene A., PhD, ACNS-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-4608</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">winters@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Between 1924 and 1990, nearly 6 million tons of asbestos-tainted vermiculite ore was mined and processed in Libby, Montana and distributed nationally to 28 processing and manufacturing plants now listed as priority asbestos contamination sites. The commercial products contaminated with Libby asbestos, including building supplies, insulation, and soil amendments, were widely used throughout Libby and distributed to over 200 sites across the US. Employees, families, and community members working, living, or recreating in close proximity to mining or manufacturing sites have suffered increased risk of developing asbestos-related disease (ARD) through primary or secondary exposures to asbestos. As a result of the commercial distribution of vermiculite products, schools, businesses, and as many as 35 million homes in the US may contain asbestos-contaminated insulation and other products. Using community-based participatory research principles, academic researchers and rural clinicians from Libby collaborated on a study to understand the bio-psychosocial health status, health care access, and financial needs of a national cohort of individuals exposed to Libby asbestos. The research was conducted in direct response to needs raised by rural clinicians at the Center for Asbestos Related Disease and a national call for improved rural health policy. In this symposium, researchers will report findings from the Libby Asbestos Health Status Study. The environmental disaster and health needs that provided the foundation for the research will be described in the first paper. The physical health outcomes with a specific focus on respiratory morbidity and the psychosocial outcomes and the related factors associated with depression provide the context for the second and third papers, respectively. In the last paper, the perception of access and financial aspects of care and rural health policy implications will be described. The findings presented from this comprehensive assessment of bio-psychosocial health status and health service needs of persons with confirmed asbestos exposure can help clinicians, educators, researchers, and policymakers understand the effects of this toxic exposure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.