Fathers' Perceptions of Support During the Postpartum and PPD Symptoms at 6 Weeks

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157682
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fathers' Perceptions of Support During the Postpartum and PPD Symptoms at 6 Weeks
Abstract:
Fathers' Perceptions of Support During the Postpartum and PPD Symptoms at 6 Weeks
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wojnar, Danuta, PhD, RN, MEd, IBCLC
P.I. Institution Name:Seattle University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:90112th Ave, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA, 98122, USA
Contact Telephone:(206)296-2544
Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore new fathers' perceptions of care and support during the transition to parenthood and depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum. Rationale/Background: The birth of a child give rise to new family dynamics as couples adapt to parenting roles and turn their focus from each other to their newborn. Although childbirth is a joyful time for most couples, approximately 13% -20% of women and 5% -10% of men develop symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) (Goodman, 2004). There is substantial knowledge about the experiences of PPD in women and a range of treatments are available. Little is known about the triggers of PPD in men and how men experience and deal with feelings of sadness during the postpartum period. Methods and Setting: This was a mixed methods study. A prospective correlational design was used to determine the relationship between the men's perceptions of care and support during the transition to parenthood and PPD symptoms at 6 weeks. Outcome Measures administered at enrollment included: Supportive Behavior Inventory (SBI) Brown (1986); Caring Other Scale (COS) (Swanson, 1999), Caring Professional Scale (CPS) (Swanson 2001), and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EDPS) (Cox, Holden, & Sagovsky, 1987). EDSP was also administered at six weeks. Descriptive phenomenological method (Colliazi, 1978) was used to conduct and analyze in-depth interviews with men who had symptoms of PPD at six weeks (interview findings are not reported here). To attain statistical power of 0.80, significance criterion alpha =.05 and effect size r=0.3 and allow for 25% attrition a sample of 110 men was recruited subsequent to IRB approval.  Participants were enrolled in the first postpartum week between January and September 2008. They were in a committed couple relationship, had no history of mental health problems, and their partner gave birth to a healthy infant at term. Results: Out of N=110, 15 men did not complete the study for unknown reasons. Participants' age ranged from 20-51 years with the majority (39%) in the 30-35 years group; 62.9% were married, the 37.1% were engaged or in a common in law relationship. They were partnered from 2 months to 14 years with the majority (52%) partnered between one and five years. Seventeen (15.4%) men lived alone while the rest with their partner. Participants? annual family income varied from less than $25K (11%) to $80K and above (38%). The majority (51%) had income ranging from $30K-$60K. Statistical analysis showed that no participants had PPD symptoms on enrollment; yet, 11 (11.5%) scored beyond cut off point for PPD on EDPS scales at 6 weeks. PPD symptoms in men were significantly correlated with income (r= -.28, p <0.01), SBI partner: sharing experiences (r = -.33, p<0.01), helpfulness (r= -.38, p <0.05), taking him seriously (r= -.44 p<0.01), believing in him (r= -.42, p<0.01); and SBI others: understanding (r= .-24, p <0.01), taking him seriously (r = -.28, p < 0.01), tolerating his up an downs (r = - .26, p<0.01); appreciating him (r= -.33, p<0.01), and believing in him (r= -.45 p<0.05). Furthermore, COS items: striving to understand (r= - .31, P<0.05), and doing things to show she cares (r =-.35, p <0.05) were significantly correlated with symptoms of PPD in men. Men were highly satisfied with support they received from health care practitioners during childbirth and postpartum periods and CPS scale items were not significantly correlated with PPS. Implications: New fathers may not show depressive symptoms during the excitement of childbirth and early postpartum but may subsequently become depressed. Yet, men's emotions do not tend to be the focus of care. Findings of this exploratory provide support for further research and the need for routine screening of both parents for symptoms of PPD. Free of charge tools, such as EPSD scales, may be used in clinical practice during the routine postpartum follow-up for screening both partners and, where appropriate, initiating further assessment and care. Limitations: The sample was of convenience and participants came from one geographical location.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFathers' Perceptions of Support During the Postpartum and PPD Symptoms at 6 Weeksen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157682-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fathers' Perceptions of Support During the Postpartum and PPD Symptoms at 6 Weeks</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wojnar, Danuta, PhD, RN, MEd, IBCLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seattle University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">90112th Ave, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA, 98122, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(206)296-2544</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wojnard@seattleu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore new fathers' perceptions of care and support during the transition to parenthood and depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum. Rationale/Background: The birth of a child give rise to new family dynamics as couples adapt to parenting roles and turn their focus from each other to their newborn. Although childbirth is a joyful time for most couples, approximately 13% -20% of women and 5% -10% of men develop symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD) (Goodman, 2004). There is substantial knowledge about the experiences of PPD in women and a range of treatments are available. Little is known about the triggers of PPD in men and how men experience and deal with feelings of sadness during the postpartum period.&nbsp;Methods and Setting: This was a mixed methods study. A prospective correlational design was used to determine the relationship between the men's perceptions of care and support during the transition to parenthood and PPD symptoms at 6 weeks. Outcome Measures administered at enrollment included: Supportive Behavior Inventory (SBI) Brown (1986); Caring Other Scale (COS) (Swanson, 1999), Caring Professional Scale (CPS) (Swanson 2001), and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EDPS) (Cox, Holden, &amp; Sagovsky, 1987). EDSP was also administered at six weeks. Descriptive phenomenological method (Colliazi, 1978) was used to conduct and analyze in-depth interviews with men who had symptoms of PPD at six weeks (interview findings are not reported here). To attain statistical power of 0.80, significance criterion alpha =.05 and effect size r=0.3 and allow for 25% attrition a sample of 110 men was recruited subsequent to IRB approval. &nbsp;Participants were enrolled in the first postpartum week between January and September 2008. They were in a committed couple relationship, had no history of mental health problems, and their partner gave birth to a healthy infant at term. Results: Out of N=110, 15 men did not complete the study for unknown reasons. Participants' age ranged from 20-51 years with the majority (39%) in the 30-35 years group; 62.9% were married, the 37.1% were engaged or in a common in law relationship. They were partnered from 2 months to 14 years with the majority (52%) partnered between one and five years. Seventeen (15.4%) men lived alone while the rest with their partner. Participants? annual family income varied from less than $25K (11%) to $80K and above (38%). The majority (51%) had income ranging from $30K-$60K. Statistical analysis showed that no participants had PPD symptoms on enrollment; yet, 11 (11.5%) scored beyond cut off point for PPD on EDPS scales at 6 weeks. PPD symptoms in men were significantly correlated with income (r= -.28, p &lt;0.01), SBI partner: sharing experiences (r = -.33, p&lt;0.01), helpfulness (r= -.38, p &lt;0.05), taking him seriously (r= -.44 p&lt;0.01), believing in him (r= -.42, p&lt;0.01); and SBI others: understanding (r= .-24, p &lt;0.01), taking him seriously (r = -.28, p &lt; 0.01), tolerating his up an downs (r = - .26, p&lt;0.01); appreciating him (r= -.33, p&lt;0.01), and believing in him (r= -.45 p&lt;0.05). Furthermore, COS items: striving to understand (r= - .31, P&lt;0.05), and doing things to show she cares (r =-.35, p &lt;0.05) were significantly correlated with symptoms of PPD in men. Men were highly satisfied with support they received from health care practitioners during childbirth and postpartum periods and CPS scale items were not significantly correlated with PPS.&nbsp;Implications: New fathers may not show depressive symptoms during the excitement of childbirth and early postpartum but may subsequently become depressed. Yet, men's emotions do not tend to be the focus of care. Findings of this exploratory provide support for further research and the need for routine screening of both parents for symptoms of PPD. Free of charge tools, such as EPSD scales, may be used in clinical practice during the routine postpartum follow-up for screening both partners and, where appropriate, initiating further assessment and care.&nbsp;Limitations: The sample was of convenience and participants came from one geographical location.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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