2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157683
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Database Design for Tailored Questionnaires in a Nursing Intervention Trial
Abstract:
Database Design for Tailored Questionnaires in a Nursing Intervention Trial
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wong, Bob, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah College of Nursing
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Contact Telephone:801-587-7866
Co-Authors:Susan L. Beck, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Professor and Carter Endowed Chair in Nursing; Jia-Wen Guo, RN, MS, Doctoral Student and Research Assistant
Purpose: A clinical trial testing a tailored intervention, designed to help men undergoing radiation for prostate cancer to manage symptoms, has led us to develop tailored data collection procedures as well. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how we utilized a ubiquitous database program (Microsoft Access) to collect data when individuals' symptoms and the self-care strategies they implemented changed on a week to week basis. Background and Rationale: The dynamic nature of symptoms and interventions can pose a problem from a data collection/management standpoint. Three strategies for 13 different symptoms over 7 different time points could be evaluated and tracked during a patient's participation in the intervention protocol. This results in 273 potential symptom management strategies for each patient. Research Issue: To deal with the complexity of each individual's unique situation, we created a novel database for gathering real time patient data conducted during a phone interview. Unlike traditional longitudinal data collection procedures, where individuals complete a common battery of instruments at multiple time points, only relevant information is obtained and examined according to how a patient answered questions from the previous week. In order to reduce interviewer time, data entry screens are designed to only be visible based on whether a patient previously reported a particular symptom. Direct entry of data by the interviewer reduces data entry time. For example, in Week 1, a patient may report experiencing fatigue. The database would prompt the phone interviewer at Week 2 to ask the patient about what strategies he used to deal with the fatigue during the past week. Each self-care and symptom management strategy would be evaluated for the participant's level of self-confidence, frequency, and perceived helpfulness. The database also will prompt the phone interviewer to ascertain any new symptoms that may have developed over the week. Conclusions and Implications: Using a database that tailors questionnaire items to evaluate individual patient's strategies for each symptom can simplify the data collection process, and reduce data entry time. This database provides a model for designing data collection tools that are relevant and tailored to specific symptoms and goals for managing them.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDatabase Design for Tailored Questionnaires in a Nursing Intervention Trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157683-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Database Design for Tailored Questionnaires in a Nursing Intervention Trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wong, Bob, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-587-7866</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bob.wong@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan L. Beck, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Professor and Carter Endowed Chair in Nursing; Jia-Wen Guo, RN, MS, Doctoral Student and Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: A clinical trial testing a tailored intervention, designed to help men undergoing radiation for prostate cancer to manage symptoms, has led us to develop tailored data collection procedures as well. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how we utilized a ubiquitous database program (Microsoft Access) to collect data when individuals' symptoms and the self-care strategies they implemented changed on a week to week basis. Background and Rationale: The dynamic nature of symptoms and interventions can pose a problem from a data collection/management standpoint. Three strategies for 13 different symptoms over 7 different time points could be evaluated and tracked during a patient's participation in the intervention protocol. This results in 273 potential symptom management strategies for each patient. Research Issue: To deal with the complexity of each individual's unique situation, we created a novel database for gathering real time patient data conducted during a phone interview. Unlike traditional longitudinal data collection procedures, where individuals complete a common battery of instruments at multiple time points, only relevant information is obtained and examined according to how a patient answered questions from the previous week. In order to reduce interviewer time, data entry screens are designed to only be visible based on whether a patient previously reported a particular symptom. Direct entry of data by the interviewer reduces data entry time. For example, in Week 1, a patient may report experiencing fatigue. The database would prompt the phone interviewer at Week 2 to ask the patient about what strategies he used to deal with the fatigue during the past week. Each self-care and symptom management strategy would be evaluated for the participant's level of self-confidence, frequency, and perceived helpfulness. The database also will prompt the phone interviewer to ascertain any new symptoms that may have developed over the week. Conclusions and Implications: Using a database that tailors questionnaire items to evaluate individual patient's strategies for each symptom can simplify the data collection process, and reduce data entry time. This database provides a model for designing data collection tools that are relevant and tailored to specific symptoms and goals for managing them.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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