Weight Bias in Pediatric Healthcare Providers: Photo Elicitation With Focus Groups

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157684
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Weight Bias in Pediatric Healthcare Providers: Photo Elicitation With Focus Groups
Abstract:
Weight Bias in Pediatric Healthcare Providers: Photo Elicitation With Focus Groups
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Woo, Teri Moser, RN, PhD, CPNP, CNL
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Denver (student); University of Portland (faculty), Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:10707 SW Moapa Ave, Portland, OR, 97219, USA
Contact Telephone:503-572-2574
Background:  The prevalence of overweight and obese children is increasing, posing a challenge for pediatric healthcare providers designing care for this population.  Overweight and obese children and adolescents experience many of the same physical and psychosocial problems as overweight adults, including weight bias. Little is known about weight bias toward children among pediatric healthcare providers when assessing and planning care. Aims:  There were two aims in this study:  (1) To describe the attitudes and beliefs of pediatric healthcare providers toward children depicted as normal weight or obese. (2) To describe the ways in which healthcare providers demonstrate weight bias when planning health care for children depicted as normal weight or obese. Methods: This was an exploratory study of weight bias among pediatric healthcare providers that used photo elicitation methodology with focus groups of pediatric providers.  Focus groups were shown sketches of normal weight and overweight twelve-year-old male and female children accompanied by standardized scenarios indicating the child was visiting the provider for a well child exam and sports physical.  Focus group interviews were analyzed utilizing ATLASti software and concept maps were developed for each scenario discussion. Results: Differences in focus group discussions demonstrated provider judgment in the approach to normal weight versus overweight children and male versus female patients. Sexuality was discussed within the normal weight but not the overweight scenarios.  Eating disorders was discussed within the normal weight female scenario. Height catches up to weight was discussed in the overweight male scenario, implying the overweight male will outgrow his obesity.  Barriers to change such as family eating patterns, living in an unsafe neighborhood and parental attitudes toward obesity were identified in the overweight male and female scenario discussions. Implications: Findings from this study will inform pediatric practice, education and nursing research.  Efforts should be made to mitigate weight bias toward overweight girls that focuses on diet and exercise and excludes certain health promotion recommendations at this age and counter the myth that overweight boys will out outgrow their obesity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeight Bias in Pediatric Healthcare Providers: Photo Elicitation With Focus Groupsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157684-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Weight Bias in Pediatric Healthcare Providers: Photo Elicitation With Focus Groups</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woo, Teri Moser, RN, PhD, CPNP, CNL</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Denver (student); University of Portland (faculty), Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10707 SW Moapa Ave, Portland, OR, 97219, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-572-2574</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">woot@up.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background:&nbsp; The prevalence of overweight and obese children is increasing, posing a challenge for pediatric healthcare providers designing care for this population.&nbsp; Overweight and obese children and adolescents experience many of the same physical and psychosocial problems as overweight adults, including weight bias. Little is known about weight bias toward children among pediatric healthcare providers when assessing and planning care. Aims:&nbsp;&nbsp;There were two aims in this study:&nbsp; (1) To describe the attitudes and beliefs of pediatric healthcare providers toward children depicted as normal weight or obese. (2)&nbsp;To&nbsp;describe the ways in which healthcare providers demonstrate weight bias when planning health care for children depicted as normal weight or obese. Methods: This was an exploratory study of weight bias among pediatric healthcare providers that used photo elicitation methodology with focus groups of pediatric providers.&nbsp; Focus groups were shown sketches of normal weight and overweight twelve-year-old male and female children accompanied by standardized scenarios indicating the child was visiting the provider for a well child exam and sports physical.&nbsp; Focus group interviews were analyzed utilizing ATLASti software and concept maps were developed for each scenario discussion.&nbsp;Results:&nbsp;Differences in focus group discussions demonstrated provider judgment in the approach to normal weight versus overweight children and male versus female patients. Sexuality was discussed within the normal weight but not the overweight scenarios.&nbsp; Eating disorders was discussed within the normal weight female scenario. Height catches up to weight was discussed in the overweight male scenario, implying the overweight male will outgrow his obesity.&nbsp; Barriers to change such as family eating patterns, living in an unsafe neighborhood and parental attitudes toward obesity were identified in the overweight male and female scenario discussions.&nbsp;Implications: Findings from this study will inform pediatric practice, education and nursing research. &nbsp;Efforts should be made to mitigate weight bias toward overweight girls that focuses on diet and exercise and excludes certain health promotion recommendations at this age and counter the myth that overweight boys will out outgrow their obesity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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