2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157685
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sexual Desire During the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopause
Abstract:
Sexual Desire During the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopause
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Woods, Nancy, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Family and Child Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:4525 E Laurel Dr NE, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA
Contact Telephone:206-369-5261
Co-Authors:Ellen Mitchell, PhD, Professor Emeritus; Kathy Smith-DiJulio, PhD, RN, Research Scientist
Introduction:  Reports of increased prevalence of lower sexual desire during the menopausal transition (MT) and early postmenopause (PM) suggest an important role for endocrine changes as well as social factors during midlife. Purposes:  The purpose was to describe changes in levels of sexual desire across the MT and early PM, including effects of age, MT-related factors, symptoms (hot flash, sleep, mood), health, and social factors including perceived stress. Rationale:  Reported research indicates that women's sexual response changes with aging, but there has been little focus on women's experiences during the menopausal transition.  Recently published research on women's sexual response indicates that sexual desire is a unique part of women's responses, not part of a linear stage-wise progression, and intimately influenced by environments as well as biology. Methods:  A subset of Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study participants who provided  data during the early reproductive, early and late menopausal transition stages or  postmenopause (N=286) including menstrual calendars for staging the MT, and annual health reports between 1990 and 2005, and morning urine samples assayed for estrone glucuronied (E1G), testosterone (T) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were included.  Multilevel modeling using the R program was used to test patterns of sexual desire related to age, MT-related factors, symptoms, health, and social factors with as many as 6526 observations.  Age was centered at 47.2 years. Results:  Women experienced a slight rise in sexual desire as they aged, but a significant decrease in sexual desire during the late MT stage (p<0.013) and early PM (p<0.0001).  Women with higher urinary E1G and T reported significantly higher levels of sexual desire whereas those with higher FSH levels reported significantly lower sexual desire (P=<0.0001, 0.021, and 0.009 respectively).  Women reporting higher perceived stress also reported lower sexual desire (p<0.0001), but history of sexual abuse did not have a significant effect.  Those most troubled by symptoms of hot flashes, fatigue, depressed mood, anxiety, getting to sleep, and awakening during the night also reported significantly lower sexual desire (p range from <0.0005 to 0.0001), but there was no effect of vaginal dryness or early morning awakening.  Women with better perceived health and those using hormone therapy also reported higher levels of sexual desire (p<0.0001 and p = 0.023 respectively). Implications: Women who are progressing through the MT are vulnerable to lower sexual desire as they enter the late MT and early PM, experience lower E1G and T and higher FSH levels, are troubled by more severe symptoms (hot flashes, sleep disruption, and mood changes), and experience a stressful social milieu.  Clinicians working with women traversing the menopausal transition should be aware that promoting healthy sexual functioning among midlife women requires consideration of their changing biology as well as ongoing life challenges.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSexual Desire During the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopauseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157685-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sexual Desire During the Menopausal Transition and Early Postmenopause</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woods, Nancy, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Family and Child Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4525 E Laurel Dr NE, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-369-5261</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nfwoods@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen Mitchell, PhD, Professor Emeritus; Kathy Smith-DiJulio, PhD, RN, Research Scientist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction:&nbsp; Reports of increased prevalence of lower sexual desire during the menopausal transition (MT) and early postmenopause (PM) suggest an important role for endocrine changes as well as social factors during midlife.&nbsp;Purposes:&nbsp; The purpose was to describe changes in levels of sexual desire across the MT and early PM, including effects of age, MT-related factors, symptoms (hot flash, sleep, mood), health, and social factors including perceived stress.&nbsp;Rationale:&nbsp; Reported research indicates that women's sexual response changes with aging, but there has been little focus on women's experiences during the menopausal transition.&nbsp; Recently published research on women's sexual response indicates that sexual desire is a unique part of women's responses, not part of a linear stage-wise progression, and intimately influenced by environments as well as biology.&nbsp;Methods:&nbsp; A subset of Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study participants who provided&nbsp; data during the early reproductive, early and late menopausal transition stages or&nbsp; postmenopause (N=286) including menstrual calendars for staging the MT, and annual health reports between 1990 and 2005, and morning urine samples assayed for estrone glucuronied (E1G), testosterone (T) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were included.&nbsp; Multilevel modeling using the R program was used to test patterns of sexual desire related to age, MT-related factors, symptoms, health, and social factors with as many as 6526 observations.&nbsp; Age was centered at 47.2 years. Results:&nbsp; Women experienced a slight rise in sexual desire as they aged, but a significant decrease in sexual desire during the late MT stage (p&lt;0.013) and early PM (p&lt;0.0001).&nbsp; Women with higher urinary E1G and T reported significantly higher levels of sexual desire whereas those with higher FSH levels reported significantly lower sexual desire (P=&lt;0.0001, 0.021, and 0.009 respectively).&nbsp; Women reporting higher perceived stress also reported lower sexual desire (p&lt;0.0001), but history of sexual abuse did not have a significant effect.&nbsp; Those most troubled by symptoms of hot flashes, fatigue, depressed mood, anxiety, getting to sleep, and awakening during the night also reported significantly lower sexual desire (p range from &lt;0.0005 to 0.0001), but there was no effect of vaginal dryness or early morning awakening.&nbsp; Women with better perceived health and those using hormone therapy also reported higher levels of sexual desire (p&lt;0.0001 and p = 0.023 respectively). Implications:&nbsp;Women who are progressing through the MT are vulnerable to lower sexual desire as they enter the late MT and early PM, experience lower E1G and T and higher FSH levels, are troubled by more severe symptoms (hot flashes, sleep disruption, and mood changes), and experience a stressful social milieu.&nbsp; Clinicians working with women traversing the menopausal transition should be aware that promoting healthy sexual functioning among midlife women requires consideration of their changing biology as well as ongoing life challenges.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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