Acupuncture for Menopausal Symptoms: An Exploration of Mechanism and Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/157686
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acupuncture for Menopausal Symptoms: An Exploration of Mechanism and Experience
Abstract:
Acupuncture for Menopausal Symptoms: An Exploration of Mechanism and Experience
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wright, Cheryl L., MSN, L.Ac
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Title:Ms.
Contact Address:5969 E. Chaucers Dr, Tucson, AZ, 85756, USA
Contact Telephone:520 312 7171
Co-Authors:Mikel Aickin, PhD, Research Professor; Judith A. Berg, RNC, WHNP, FAANP, FAAN, Associate Professor; Heather Zwickey, PhD, Associate Professor
Purposes/Aims: To establish feasibility for a larger study to gain new knowledge about the physiology of acupuncture by correlating menopausal symptom experiences with the effects of acupuncture and two biomarkers: heart rate variability (HRV), which will establish cardiac autonomic nervous system reactions to acupuncture, and interleukin 6 (IL6), a proinflammatory cytokine to explore possible immune inflammatory system response to acupuncture. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Symptoms commonly seen in menopause, such as fatigue, mood disorders/depression, sleep disorders and new onset myalgias/arthralgias have been associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines, including IL6. Recent work has linked stimulation of the vagus nerve with suppression of the immune-inflammatory response. Additionally, several small studies have indicated that acupuncture may alleviate pain and improve mood, though mechanism has not been established. Thus, theoretically, an acupuncture needle may influence the vagus nerve through peripheral nerve stimulation and affect the immune-inflammatory response. Vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flashes and sweats, experienced during the menopausal transition have been linked theoretically to autonomic instability affecting the vasculature. Heart rate variability has been shown to reflect the effects of the autonomic nervous system on cardiac activity. Roughly 14 separate, albeit small studies suggest acupuncture may effectively control these symptoms. By evaluating the effects of acupuncture on HRV we hope to correlate increased parasympathetic influences on HRV with decreased vasomotor symptoms. Methods: This study represents an innovative research design that examined each individual participant as a dynamic system. Each subject underwent ten acupuncture treatments, using a standard, traditional Chinese medicine-based acupoint protocol, over a 4-week period, with multiple, frequent measures collected. Sample: 12 healthy, non-surgically induced menopausal women with symptom scores greater than or equal to 22 on the Menopausal Rating Scale (MRS). Data collection: Daily MRS symptom scores, pre/post-acupuncture serum interleukin 6 levels at first and last treatment, continuous electrocardiogram monitoring with subsequent HRV analysis before and during each acupuncture session. Results: Preliminary results suggest improved symptoms with HRV analysis and cytokine data pending. Implications: In addition to exploration of physiologic mechanism, acupuncture researchers need to consider using innovative, meaningful and individual-oriented research designs. This feasibility study illustrates one such design, and includes hypotheses for physiologic mechanisms related to the acupuncture needle.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcupuncture for Menopausal Symptoms: An Exploration of Mechanism and Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/157686-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acupuncture for Menopausal Symptoms: An Exploration of Mechanism and Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wright, Cheryl L., MSN, L.Ac</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5969 E. Chaucers Dr, Tucson, AZ, 85756, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520 312 7171</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwright80@hotmail.com, cwright@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mikel Aickin, PhD, Research Professor; Judith A. Berg, RNC, WHNP, FAANP, FAAN, Associate Professor; Heather Zwickey, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: To establish feasibility for a larger study to gain new knowledge about the physiology of acupuncture by correlating menopausal symptom experiences with the effects of acupuncture and two biomarkers: heart rate variability (HRV), which will establish cardiac autonomic nervous system reactions to acupuncture, and interleukin 6 (IL6), a proinflammatory cytokine to explore possible immune inflammatory system response to acupuncture. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: Symptoms commonly seen in menopause, such as fatigue, mood disorders/depression, sleep disorders and new onset myalgias/arthralgias have been associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines, including IL6. Recent work has linked stimulation of the vagus nerve with suppression of the immune-inflammatory response. Additionally, several small studies have indicated that acupuncture may alleviate pain and improve mood, though mechanism has not been established. Thus, theoretically, an acupuncture needle may influence the vagus nerve through peripheral nerve stimulation and affect the immune-inflammatory response. Vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flashes and sweats, experienced during the menopausal transition have been linked theoretically to autonomic instability affecting the vasculature. Heart rate variability has been shown to reflect the effects of the autonomic nervous system on cardiac activity. Roughly 14 separate, albeit small studies suggest acupuncture may effectively control these symptoms. By evaluating the effects of acupuncture on HRV we hope to correlate increased parasympathetic influences on HRV with decreased vasomotor symptoms. Methods: This study represents an innovative research design that examined each individual participant as a dynamic system. Each subject underwent ten acupuncture treatments, using a standard, traditional Chinese medicine-based acupoint protocol, over a 4-week period, with multiple, frequent measures collected. Sample: 12 healthy, non-surgically induced menopausal women with symptom scores greater than or equal to 22 on the Menopausal Rating Scale (MRS). Data collection: Daily MRS symptom scores, pre/post-acupuncture serum interleukin 6 levels at first and last treatment, continuous electrocardiogram monitoring with subsequent HRV analysis before and during each acupuncture session. Results: Preliminary results suggest improved symptoms with HRV analysis and cytokine data pending. Implications: In addition to exploration of physiologic mechanism, acupuncture researchers need to consider using innovative, meaningful and individual-oriented research designs. This feasibility study illustrates one such design, and includes hypotheses for physiologic mechanisms related to the acupuncture needle.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:06:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:06:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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